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. , Tanos P. , Trásy B. , Várbíró G. Developments in water quality monitoring and management in large river catchments using the Danube River as an example , Environmental Science & Policy , Vol. 64 , 2016 , pp. 141 – 154

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] Berndtsson J. C. Storm-water quality of first flush urban runoff in relation to different traffic characteristics , Urban Water J , Vol. 11 , No. 4 , 2014 , pp. 284 – 296

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Environmental Outlook) (2007) United Nations Environment Programme (Geneva). ICPDR (Interational Commission for the Protection of the Danube River Water Quality in the Danube River Basin — 2004) (2007) International Commission for

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, 506/509 549 557 Blanco, S., Ector, L. and Bécares, E. (2004): Epiphytic diatoms as water quality indicators in Spanish shallow lakes. - Vie Milieu

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117 Rhoades, J. D. 1987: Use of saline water irrigation. Water Quality Bull. , 12 , 14-22. Use of saline water irrigation Water

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physical and chemical parameters as well as the bacterial community structures of the reservoir lake system. Another objective was to reveal and compare the water quality changes during the storage period in two different years in terms of weather

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, D. 1992. Water quality assessment . Chapman D. (Ed.). Chapman and Hall, London (on behalf of UNESCO, WHO and UNEP). Chapman D. Water quality

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Abstract  

The association properties of Am with aquatic humic substances in a 0.01M NaClO4 solution at pH 6-8 were studied on the basis of molecular size distribution. Ten humic substances isolated from river water with different water quality (pH 3.9-8.0 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of 2-40 mg/l) were used for comparing their effects on the association of Am. The molecular size distribution of Am in the presence of humic substances from an uncolored river water (DOC 2 mg/l) was different from that at the experimental systems using humic substances from brownish and high DOC (14-40 mg/l) river waters.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: F. Espinoza-Quiñones, S. Palácio, A. Módenes, N. Szymanski, C. Zacarkim, D. Zenatti, M. Fornari, M. Rizzutto, M. Tabacniks, N. Added, and Alexander Kroumov

Abstract  

The region of Toledo River, Paraná, Brazil is characterized by intense anthropogenic activities. Hence, metal concentrations and physical–chemical parameters of Toledo River water were determined in order to complete an environmental evaluation catalog. Samples were collected monthly during one year period at seven different sites from the source down the river mouth, physical–chemical variables were analyzed, and major metallic ions were measured. Metal analysis was performed by using the synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique. A statistical analysis was applied to evaluate the reliability of experimental data. The analysis of obtained results have shown that a strong correlation between physical–chemical parameters existed among sites 1 and 7, suggesting that organic pollutants were mainly responsible for decreasing the Toledo River water quality.

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Abstract  

In this work, sorption of Ni(II) from aqueous solution to goethite as a function of various water quality parameters and temperature was investigated. The results indicated that the pseudo-second-order rate equation fitted the kinetic sorption well. The sorption of Ni(II) to goethite was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. A positive effect of HA/FA on Ni(II) sorption was found at pH < 8.0, whereas a negative effect was observed at pH > 8.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models were applied to simulate the sorption isotherms at three different temperatures of 293.15 K, 313.15 K and 333.15 K. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0, ΔS 0 and ΔG 0) were calculated from the temperature dependent sorption, and the results indicated that the sorption was endothermic and spontaneous. At low pH, the sorption of Ni(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange with Na+/H+ on goethite surfaces, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH.

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