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virgatum ) [ 2 – 4 ]. Phragmites australis , a kind of non-edible biomass resource, is a cosmopolitan species of giant wetland plant native to every continent but Antarctica. Furthermore, P. australis has ever multiplied wildly as an

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Abstract  

The impact of a U-mill tailing on radionuclide accumulation by plants was assayed. In particular, a preliminary screening of 226Ra, 238U and 230Th in Marsh marigold (Caltha palustris L.), soft rush (Juncus effusus L.) and Tall Moor grass (Molinia arundinacea (L.) Moench) grown in a marsh habitat is presented. Activity concentrations for the studied radionuclides and their transfer factors for the particular plants are shown and discussed.

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The study site is the Honghe National Nature Reserve, a Ramsar designated site on the Sanjiang Plain in Northeast China. We present results regarding the spatial pattern and structure of plant communities in these most important natural but continually diminishing freshwater wetlands of China to help promote both protection and restoration. By investigating three ecological levels (landscape, ecosystem and community), this paper quantifies the characteristics of spatial pattern with the aim to identify specific ecological correlations with different hydrogeomorphic features. Specifically, the research involves hierarchical mapping of vegetation types by use of remote sensed data, and the coupling of landscape indices with fluvial topographic zones that have been deduced by GIS from DEM. Statistics from historical survey data are also used to measure the degradation of marshes as well as the historical change of the hydrological regime. We found that dominant is the Calamagrostis angustifolia — Carex spp. community type, a wet meadow and marsh complex within the prevailing landscape mosaic of shrubland and meadow. The results suggest that the sites’ hydro-geomorphic character has decisive influence on plant community structure and composition. There is only limited direct human interference in the sites and, as a consequence, the spatial pattern of vegetation distribution is natural. However, changes to the hydrological regime as the result of extensive irrigation activity in the surrounding area has led to rapid degradation of marsh wetlands within the sites, which threatens the ecological status in this storehouse of “Natural Genes” in the reserve.

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Ponds contribute substantially to the maintenance of regional biodiversity. Despite a growing body of literature on biotic-abiotic relationships in ponds, only few generalizations have been made. The difficulty in identifying the main drivers of pond biodiversity has been typically attributed to the heterogeneity of the local and regional conditions characterizing ponds. However, little is known on how the use of different analytical approaches and community response variables affects the results of analysis of community patterns in ponds. Here, we used a range of methods to model the response of water beetle and plant community data (species richness and composition) to a set of 12 environmental and management variables in 45 farmland ponds. The strength of biotic-abiotic relationships and the contribution of each variable to the overall explained variance in the reduced models varied substantially, for both plants and beetles, depending on the method used to analyze the data. Models of species richness included a lower number of variables and explained a larger amount of variation compared to models of species composition, reflecting the higher complexity characterizing multispecies response matrices. Only two variables were never selected by any of the model, indicative of the heterogeneity characterizing pond ecosystems, while some models failed to select important variables. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of multiple modeling approaches when attempting to identify the principal determinants of biodiversity for each response variable, including at least a non-parametric approach, as well as the use of both species richness and composition as the response variables. The results of this modeling exercise are discussed in relation to their practical use in the formulation of conservation strategies.

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Partly carbonated seeds testify that barley, millet, lentil, legumes, walnut and strawberry were planted in the territory that belonged to the villa. Grape and cereals, the remains of which were found in a small amount, were probably transported from elsewhere to the inhabitants of the villa located 1000 m high. This is suggested by the presence of the amphorae as well. Remains of wetland plants and fish scales were recovered by flotation; their presence was due to the vicinity of the Fucine Lake.

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To analyze the rhizosphere bacterial communities in wetlands, the total lipid content was extracted from a peat soil and 4 abundant wetland plant roots ( Typha angustifolia L., Salix cinerea L., Carex pseudocyperus L., Thelypteris palustris Salisb.). The separated phospholipid fraction was further fractionated and deriva­tized prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement. In the evaluation only the bacteria-specific fatty acids were used in order to neglect fatty acid information derived from plant root cells. Based on these analyses, a high level bacterial concentration was demonstrated in the rhizosphere, and the relative occurrence of aerobe and anaerobe, Gram positive and negative bacteria, methanotrophs, sulphate reducers and Actinobacteria was determined. Through the PLFA analysis the study of bacteria regardless of culturability was possible.

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of wastewater in the rhizosphere of wetland plants — the root zone method. Water Science and Technology. 19 . 107--118. Treatment of wastewater in the rhizosphere of wetland plants - the root zone method

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90 445 450 Pezeshki, S. R. (2001) Wetland plant responses to soil flooding. Environ. Exp. Bot. 46 , 299

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Stutzenbaker, C.D. 1999. Aquatic and Wetland Plants of the Western Gulf Coast . Texas Parks and Wildlife Press, Austin, Texas. Stutzenbaker C.D. Aquatic

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Cook, C. D. K. (1996): Aquatic and wetland plants in India: a reference book and identification manual for the vascular plants found in permanent or seasonal freshwater in the subcontinent of India south of the Himalayas . — Oxford University Press

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