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Dahlgren, Sven-Olof. 1998. Word Order in Arabic . Sweden: ACTA Universitatis Gothoburgensis. Dahlgren S.-O. Word Order in Arabic

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This paper gives a syntactic overview and analysis of exclamative constructions in Hungarian. Its main purpose is to describe word order variation in exclamative clauses, in comparison with other sentence types. The formal properties of exclamatives that will be discussed here have important consequences for the theories of exclamatives and exclamativity in general. The empirical findings will force one to reconsider the syntactic theory of exclamatives put forward by Portner and Zanuttini (2003). The key modification affects the role focus plays in exclamatives: it will be shown that languages can use available syntactic means of focusing in the expression of exclamatives.

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This article revisits the (non)configurationality debate of the 80s and early 90s concerning Hungarian, a `free word order' language, which was shown during that period to be characterized by an articulate and, crucially, hierarchical preverbal domain, with A-bar positions dedicated to discourse functions such as topic and focus. What this debate did not conclusively settle, however, is the question whether or not the structure of A-positions in Hungarian is also configurational. The most prevalent, and indeed empirically most well-argued and elaborated analysis that has emerged is that of É. Kiss's (1987a, b; 1991, 1994a, 2002, 2003), according to which the answer is negative: arguments are base-generated in the verb phrase in a free order in a flat structure. The present paper challenges this view by demonstrating systematically that the arguments put forward to back it up are inconclusive, and in fact it fails descriptively as well. The alternative proposed here is based on a hierarchical verb phrase (vacated by the raised verb) and a Japanese-type local scrambling movement that operates in the post-verbal domain of the clause. The scrambling movement analysis, besides being theoretically more desirable than the nonconfigurational verb phrase approach, makes available a superior descriptive coverage by accounting for a varied set of structural symmetries and asymmetries holding between subject and object. Modulo scrambling, Hungarian is configurational all the way down.

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É. Kiss, Katalin 1981a. Syntactic relations in Hungarian, a “free” word order language. In: Linguistic Inquiry 12: 185–215. Kiss K. Syntactic relations in Hungarian, a “free” word

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The author claims that word-order shifts take place in the course of the translation of almost every sentence of translated texts, regardless of language-pair and direction of translation. Some of these shifts are obligatory, since without them we would not get a grammatically correct TL sentence. Another class of word-order shifts is not obligatory but optional. Optional word-order shifts are performed in order to ensure the cohesion of the TL text. Obligatory word-order shifts which lead to a grammatically correct TL sentence may distort the communicative structure: cohesive ties get loose, unimportant elements get highlighted and important elements are blurred. Many optional word-order changes are performed in order to preserve the communicative structure of the sentences, and thus the cohesion of the text. The present paper will discuss the different types of optional word-order shifts in translation from Hungarian into IE languages and vice versa.

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which a modifier is located directly after the noun. This particular word order raises some challenging questions, which can be answered only through an accurate analysis of Latin instances and their Hebrew patterns. Discontinuous phrases can be best

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Summary

This paper aims at describing some of the main structural and functional characteristics of two subordinate patterns, namely infinitive clauses governed by verba dicendi et sentiendi (i.e. the so-called Accusativus cum Infinitivo) and participial clauses, as they occur in the Vulgate. The characteristics of the use of the Accusativus cum Infinitivo will be interpreted within the context of the uses of this structure in other Latin texts written in different periods. In particular, and in the framework of a functional-typologi- cal approach, we will investigate word-order phenomena.

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929 Hakuta, Kenji 1982. Interaction between particles and word order in the comprehension of simple sentences in Japanese children. In: Developmental Psychology 62: 62

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References Alexiadou , Artemis and Elena Anagnostopoulou . 1998 . Parametrizing AGR: Word order, V-movement and EPP-checking. Natural Language & Linguisti . Theory 16

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? 2005 Rutherford, W. 1989. Interlanguage and Pragmatic Word Order. In: Gass, S. & Schachter, J. (eds) Linguistic Perspectives on Second Language

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