Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 116 items for :

  • "World War II" x
  • All content x
Clear All

peasantry have been exposed to considerable changes between the two wars, the really radical transformation of lifestyles was imposed on rural population after World War II (Fél – Hofer 1969; Balogh 2003 ; Ö. Kovács 2013 ). Definite distinction should be

Open access

Jean Sibelius and Béla Bartók, two composers from the fringe of Europe, had to create space for themselves in the midst of Austro-German dominance of turn-of-the-century music. Both encountered in the hitherto unknown folk music of their respective countries an “Other” that enabled them to develop an idiom different from the mainstream but equally coherent. Sibelius became in Finland's a national hero due to his patriotic music from the turn-of-the-century. As a consequence, his figure grew into mountainous dimensions, and many of his successors were doomed to live under his shadow. After World War II a new beginning was needed. Anxious of the influence of Sibelius and searching for a new starting point young composers encountered the music of Bartók, Prokofiev and Shostakovich, the otherness of which enabled them to “misread” the Sibelian tradition in a creative manner. Especially important was Bartók, notably for Joonas Kokkonen (1921-96). Some later composers, for whom Sibelius was not a problem anymore, were looking in Bartók's works for new patterns of misprision.

Restricted access

-201. Heppner, E. G. (1993): Shanghai Refuge. A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto. Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press. Shanghai Refuge. A Memoir of the World War II Jewish Ghetto

Restricted access

Magyarország külpolitikája a II. világháború kitörésének időszakában, 1939-1940 [Hungary's Foreign Policy in the Era of the Outbreak of World War II], Gyula Juhász, ed. (Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1962), volume IV of the series Diplomáciai iratok Magyarország

Restricted access

This article explores the history of Belső-Erzsébetváros, the Inner 7th District of Budapest, an urban area regarded as a historic Jewish quarter in today’s discourse. The historical summary focuses on societal transformations caused by political changes and historical tragedies during the 20th century. One explicit goal is to show in which ways the Inner 7th District of Budapest is unique among similar historic districts of other Central European cities: in Central European comparison, a large proportion of its population — just like the Jewish population of Budapest in general — survived the Holocaust. Therefore Jewish heritage has been experienced differently there than elsewhere in cities of the region.

After briefly introducing the historical evolution of the Inner 7th District before World War II, the article portrays local society, and explores the social relations that characterized this area until the last years of the World War II. Patterns of ethnic and confessional intermixing will be interpreted as defining characteristics of the district in the interwar period. Then the author will show the way wartime events and political measures disrupted the social fabric of the neighborhood, and transformed the local population dramatically by the spring of 1945. At the same time, patterns of survival will be also emphasized. After discussing the impact of World War II and the Holocaust, the article will highlight the post-1945 shifts in local society, exploring the impact of migration as well as the connection between societal transformation and the area’s physical decay in the Communist period. Finally, the author will briefly touch upon the past 25 years, discussing the possibilities of revival in the area, pointing out the role of Jewish heritage in the recent rediscovery of the neighborhood.

Restricted access

References [1] Szikszai Cs. Hungary’s World War II bomb bay database , Proceedings of Theory Meets Practice in

Restricted access

Group after World War II and analyzes current RIKEN comparing to RIKEN before the end of World War II. The research was conducted based on literature review and interviews. Though the success of RIKEN and the RIKEN Industrial Group was possible

Restricted access

In September 1939, within a short span of time, Poland was attacked by Germany from the west and the Soviet army from the eastern borders. According to a previous diplomatic agreement, the Polish government fled to Romania. Noting these events, while resisting political and military constrictions, Hungary opened its borders to the fleeing Polish civilians and to members of the military force to offer refuge. In fact, more than a hundred thousand Polish citizens found asylum in Hungary at that time. At this historical point, Stanisława Rogińska and her daughter Halina Waroczewska fled from Warsaw, and after crossing the Hungarian border settled first at Szob, then moved to Klotildliget, Leányfalu, and finally to Keszthely at Lake Balaton. The writing, based on their memories, presents the dramatic moments of crossing the border and of getting established in those first difficult months. The memoir also illustrates the historically honoured Hungarian–Polish friendship, which at this time was forced by events outside of either nation’s control. It also illuminates the noblest pages of Hungarian history.

Restricted access

War II. As a consequence, despite different attitudes towards cultivating national cultures in each of the socialist countries, ethnochoreological research from its beginnings had strong national orientations and was theoretically and methodologically

Restricted access