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-related sequences involved in resistance to abiotic stress in Triticeae. Plant Mol. Biol. , 48 , 649-665. Chromosome regions and stress-related sequences involved in resistance to abiotic stress in Triticeae

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Dolferus, R., Xuemei, J., Richards, R.A. 2011. Abiotic stress and control of grain number in cereals. Plant Sci. 181 :331–341. Richards R.A. Abiotic stress and control of grain number in

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Members of WRKY gene family encode transcription factors involved in plant developmental processes and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In order to understand the function of the TaWRKY71 gene, a homologue gene was isolated and characterised in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotype TAM107. Tissue-specific gene expression profiles indicated that TaWRKY71 was constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, stamen and pistil. The relative expression of TaWRKY71 was elucidated under ABA treatment and other abiotic stresses. In agreement with this, several putative cis-acting elements involved in ABA-response, drought-inducibility, low-temperature and heat response were detected in the promoter region of TaWRKY71. The function of TaWRKY71 was further determined by transforming Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgenic plants over-expressing TaWRKY71 displayed enhanced seed germination under ABA treatment and were tolerant to salt and drought stresses. These results indicate that TaWRKY71 gene might play important roles in seed germination and abiotic stress response.

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. Banerjee , A. , Roychoudhury , A. ( 2016 ) Group II late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins: structural and functional aspects in plant abiotic stress . Plant Growth Reg. 79 , 1 – 17 . 4

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stress responses and tolerance in rice . Rice 5 , 1 – 9 . 21. Tuteja , N. ( 2007 ) Abscisic acid and abiotic stress signaling . Plant Signal. Behav. 2 , 135

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A simple and efficient protocol has been developed for high frequency plant regeneration through callus cultures derived from leaf bases of abiotic stress sensitive Asian indica rice variety IR 64. Leaf base segments (4–5 mm diameter) were obtained from 6-day-old dark grown seedlings germinated on halfstrength Murashige and Skoog medium and cultured on MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2.2–18 μM) and Kinetin (0.2–1.7 μM). Among the various combinations, 13.5 μM 2,4-D and 1.3 μM Kn resulted in high callus induction frequency (87.5%) with a maximum fresh weight of 0.22 g per segment. The regeneration frequency was 75.5% with multiple shoots within 3 weeks of transfer on MS medium supplemented with 13.3 μM 6-benzylamino purine and 8 μM Naphthaleneacetic acid. The shoots readily rooted on half-strength MS medium without any hormonal supplements. In vitro regenerated plantlets with multiple shoots and roots were transferred to sterile soil and vermiculite mix and maintained in shade house for 30 days. Complete plantlets were then transferred to nursery and acclimatized to the external environment until seed set. RAPD profile reveals monomorphism and thus confirming the genetic stability of the regenerated plants. This method has the potential for both direct as well as indirect method of transformation for the production of genetically modified plants.

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Cattivelli, L., Baldi, P., Crosatti, C., Fonzo, N.D., Faccioli, P., Grossi, M., Mastrangelo, A.M., Pecchioni, N., Stanca, A.M. 2002. Chromosome regions and stress-related sequences involved in resistance to abiotic stress in Triticeae . Plant Mol. Biol

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Biotic and abiotic stresses induce increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through distinct pathways: pathogen infections activate specific ROS-producing enzymes (i.e. NADPH oxidase, cell wall peroxidases), which results in accumulation of cellular or intercellular ROS, such as superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. Abiotic stresses, on the other hand, cause elevated ROS production principally through an impairment of photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport pathways. Also, these two types of stresses have diverse effects on the antioxidant system of the plant. Results of experiments studying the interaction of abiotic and biotic stresses largely depend on the degree of the applied abiotic stress treatment, the compatible or incompatible host-pathogen interaction and the timing of inoculation in relation to the timing of a preceding abiotic stress treatment.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors:
N. Sinha
,
V. Priyanka
,
K.T. Ramya
,
T. Leena
,
J.A. Bhat
,
Harikrishna
,
N. Jain
,
P.K. Singh
,
G.P. Singh
, and
K.V. Prabhu

Abiotic stresses are major constraints to wheat productivity in many parts of the world. Tolerance to abiotic stresses can be achieved indirectly by selection for morpho-physiological traits. Physiological trait based breeding has been associated with improved performance under stress; and hence can combat and adapt wheat to drought and heat stress. Therefore, in the present study, phenotyping was carried out for agro-physiological traits in 52 diverse wheat germplasm lines under timely sown, rainfed and late sown environments for two years. Mean yield of the genotypes over the six environments were positively correlated with NDVI, days to maturity and negatively correlated with canopy temperature. The phenotypic data validated marker-trait associations of a number of meta-QTLs identified earlier for different physiological and agronomic traits. Six and seven meta-QTL genomic regions were found to be consistent in their expression for two years under rainfed/restricted irrigation and late sown environments, respectively. Expression analysis of the underlying candidate gene AK248593.1 in meta-QTL26 region revealed two folds higher expression in the NILs carrying the co-localized SSR markers. The linked markers of the thirteen meta-QTL regions associated with different traits can be used for effective transfer of the QTLs through marker assisted selection in wheat breeding programmes.

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Acta Agronomica Hungarica
Authors:
P. Bónis
,
T. Árendás
,
I. Jócsák
,
C. Mikecz
,
G. Micskei
, and
L. Marton

Inbred maize lines were treated with normal and double rates of post-emergence herbicides in a small-plot field experiment in one dry and one wet year. The chlorophyll a + b content of symptom-free ear-leaves was determined using a spectrophotometer after 50% silking in order to determine whether various rates of post-emergence herbicides had any effect on the chlorophyll content at flowering and how this was influenced by the type of year. The chlorophyll a + b content of the inbred lines was greatly dependent on the year, with values twice as high in the wet year as in the dry year. Treatment with tembotrione + isoxadifen-ethyl had no effect on the chlorophyll content in either year. Both rates of mesotrione + terbutylazine reduced the chlorophyll a + b content of one stress-sensitive inbred line in the dry year, but not in the wet year. In the wet year bentazone + dicamba increased the chlorophyll content, but only for one line was this effect significant irrespective of the dose. In the dry year the double dose caused a significant increase in this genotype, but the chlorophyll contents of the other lines did not differ significantly from the control.

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