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L. Kárpáti 2006 Methodology of micro-Deval test for aggregates for railway ballast Építőanyagok 58/3 92 96

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characteristics of the aggregates , Materials Characterization , Vol. 6 , No. 1 , 2010 , pp. 90 – 96 . [2] Mália M. , de Brito J. , Pinheiro M. D

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Introduction Igneous rocks are frequently used as aggregate in Hungary. Volcanic rocks such as basalt and andesite are the most common types found in Hungary and utilized in the construction industry as aggregates ( Gálos and

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Dmitar Zorić, Dušan Lazar, Ognjen Rudić, Miroslava Radeka, Jonjaua Ranogajec, and Helena Hiršenberger

Introduction In recent years much effort has been done in order to find the best way to use different kinds of waste materials for the production of the lightweight aggregates (LWA) and lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC) for

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1 Introduction Achieving the maximum density of the aggregate is one of the most important objectives of concrete design. The higher packing density of aggregate improves the performance of both of the fresh and hardened concrete by reducing the

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Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: Zsófia Patkó, Albert Császár, György Acsády, Iván Őry, Éva Takács, and József Fűrész

M.I. Furman 2001 Circulating monocyte-platelet aggregates are a more sensitive marker of in vivo platelet activation than platelet surface P-selectin studies in baboons, human coronary intervention

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(fib) . Ernst&Sohn, Lausanne, Switzerland 2010. fib Bulletin 8, Lightweith Aggregate Concrete . International Federation for Structural Concrete (fib) , 2000.

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Abstract  

Aggregated processes appear in many areas of statistics, natural sciences and economics and studying their behavior has a considerable importance from a purely probabilistic point of view as well. Granger (1980) showed that aggregating processes of simple structure can lead to processes with much more complex dynamics, in particular, aggregating random coefficient AR(1) processes can result in long memory processes. This opens a new way to analyze complex processes by constructing such processes from simple ‘building blocks’ via aggregation. The basic statistical problem of aggregation theory is, given a sample {Y 1 (N), …, Y n (N)} of size n of the N-fold aggregated process, to draw conclusions for the structure of the constituting processes (“disaggregation”) and use this for describing the asymptotic behavior of the aggregated process. Probabilistically, this requires determining the limit distribution of nonlinear functionals of {Y 1 (N), …, Y n (N)}, which depends sensitively on the relative order of n and N. In this survey paper, we give a detailed asymptotic study of aggregated linear processes with an arbitrary (possibly infinite) number of parameters and apply the results to the disaggregation problem of AR(1) and AR(2) processes. We also discuss the problem of long memory of aggregated processes.

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Scopus and Google Scholar with regard to number of articles published and number of citations. Aggregated citations of cited articles (ACCA) The proposed solution for citation analysis to evaluate journals is based on the

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: J. Kučerík, H. Čechlovská, P. Bursáková, and M. Pekař

Abstract  

The thermodynamic stability of lignite humic acids (sodium salt) aggregates was studied by high resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy within the temperature interval from 5 to 90°C. The changes in differential ultrasonic velocity (U12) showed strong differences among humic solutions within the concentration range from 0.005 to 10 g L−1. Measurement revealed several transitions which were attributed to the weakening of humic secondary structure. Concentration around 1 g L−1 seemed to be a limit under which the change of the prevalence and importance of hydration occurred. Above this concentration the difference in U12 decreased following the temperature increase which was explained as a dominance of hydrophilic hydration. In contrast, below this concentration, the temperature dependence of U12 resulted in increasing tendency which was attributed to the prevalence of hydrophobic hydration, i.e. uncovering of apolar groups towards surrounding water. Additional experiments in which the humic sample was modified by hydrochloric acid resulted in a slight structural stabilization which lead to the conclusion that humic micelle-like subaggregates form an open-layer assemblies easily accessible for interaction with an extraneous molecule. That was partly verified by addition of propionic acid which brought about even larger reconformation of humic aggregates and exhibition of polar groups towards hydration water. The reversible changes in humate solutions induced by elevated temperatures provided the evidence about the existence of significant physical interactions among humic molecules resulting in formation of various kinds of aggregates. The nature of aggregates, mainly the stability and conformation, strongly depends on the concentration. Evidently, the changes observed in this work cannot be simply explained as expansions or conformational changes of macromolecular coils.

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