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Authors: E. Szabó, É. Gelencsér, E. Kovács, A. Jánosi, K. Takács and E. Kiss

In our research we studied the occurrence of the main apple allergen coding gene-families (Mal d 1, Mal d 2, Mal d 3, Mal d 4) in 16 different and most preferably consumed apple varieties. After the DNA isolation by Wizard method the simple PCR reaction was used to examine the apple allergen-coding genes. To identify the presence of the four allergenic protein-coding genes two primer pairs were chosen. The presence of these allergens in most apple varieties could be confirmed. According to our results two varieties — Jonathan and Granny Smith — were found to contain the lowest amount of the coding genes of the allergenic apple proteins studied by us. Besides this, polymorph pattern was obtained by the use of Mal d 1 primer, which may lead to determine apple varieties with small amount of Mal d 1 allergens.The confirmation study of the presence of potential apple allergens by RNA and protein techniques is our plan in the near future.

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Insects are alternative protein sources as nutritious novel food. However, there are some risks associated with the consumption of insects, even if rearing in controlled systems. Except for a recent EFSA opinion on the safety of insects as food, the European law is not conclusive regarding using insects as food products. Insects may be associated with microorganisms, but the prevalence of pathogens is usually lower than in case of other animal proteins. Insect proteins can induce allergic reactions, but only few studies are available on allergic reactions due to insect ingestion, and direct hypersensitivity to insect protein has not been proven. Some insect species are considered toxic, because some toxic substances are accumulated from toxic plants or are synthesized by the insects. However, there are few reports available about adverse reactions caused by insect consumption. Insects and insect derived food products may contain hazardous chemicals such as heavy metals, dioxins, mycotoxins, plant toxins, biocides, and veterinary drugs. However, data on hazardous chemicals in reared insects and accumulation of chemical contaminants from the substrates are limited. This review is not demonstrating the safety of insects as a food category, but the possibility of insects for human consumption with no more hazards than other animal products.

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54 Yano, M., Nakamura, R., Hayakawa, S. & Torii, S. (1989): Purification and properties of allergenic proteins in buckwheat seeds. Agric. biol. Chem. , 53 , (9), 2387

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. Szabó , E.E. , Gelencsér, É. , Kovács , E. , Jánosi , A. , Takács , K. & Kiss , E. ( 2012 ): Examinations of allergenic proteins coding genes of some domestic apple cultivars . Acta Alimentaria , 41 , 8 – 18

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Authors: Saeed Khalili, Abolfazl Jahangiri, Hojat Borna, Kobra Ahmadi Zanoos and Jafar Amani

56 1019 Li, K.B., Issac, P., Krishnan, A.: Predicting allergenic proteins using wavelet transform. Bioinformatics 20 , 2572 (2004

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varieties of soybean: key food and feed nutrients and antinutrients. Paris, 2001. 312 Ogawa, T., Bando, N., Tsuji, H., Nishikawa, K. and Kitamura, K. (1995): Identification of the soybean allergenic protein, Gly m Bd 30

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Weangsripanaval, T., Nomura, N., Moriyama, T., Ohta, N. & Ogawa, T. (2003): Identification of suberization-associated anionic peroxidase as a possible allergenic protein from tomato. Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem. , 67 , 1299

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Food safety in focus

The last ten years — The first decade of the 21 st century in the life of the Central Food Research Institute

Author: D. Bánáti

., Gelencsér, É., Kovács, E. & Jánosi, A. (2009): Az alma allergén fehérjéi. (Allergenic proteins of apple.) Élelmezési Ipar , 68 , 9–22. Jánosi A. Az alma allergén fehérjéi

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