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Abstract  

For everyk≥1 consider the waiting time until each pattern of lengthk over a fixed alphabet of sizen appears at least once in an infinite sequence of independent, uniformly distributed random letters. Lettingn→∞ we determine the limiting finite dimensional joint distributions of these waiting times after suitable normalization and provide an estimate for the rate of convergence. It will turn out that these waiting times are getting independent.

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Cet article se propose de présenter les lignes principales d’un débat en cours dans le monde arabe depuis plusieurs décennies qui porte sur quelques implications de l’écriture arabe et de la linguistique générale d’un point de vue idéologique. En particulier, on analysera les raisons qui ont poussé certains linguistes arabes à proposer que l’écriture arabe puisse être employée dans la transcription des variétés néo-arabes et, plus en détail, qu’elle puisse substituer l’Alphabet Phonétique International, actuellement en usage, qui se base sur un système graphique essentiellement de type gréco-latin.

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A preliminary report of the international research project on a Greek papyrus fragment from Ptolemaic Egypt (first half or middle of the second century BC) P. Vindob. G60514-60518.

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Abstract

We study the set of the representable numbers in base with ρ>1 and n∊ℕ and with digits in an arbitrary finite real alphabet A. We give a geometrical description of the convex hull of the representable numbers in base q and alphabet A and an explicit characterization of its extremal points. A characterizing condition for the convexity of the set of representable numbers is also shown.

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One characteristic feature of the vocabulary of Rusyn language which makes it different from the vocabulary of other East Slavic languages is the presence of Hungarian loanwords in it. From the middle of the 19th to the early 20th century, certain Rusyn authors wrote their Rusyn works using the Latin alphabet based on the Hungarian orthography. The paper is devoted to this phenomenon which remained almost unnoticed by the researchers.

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The paper offers a sample of a Khitan–English–Chinese Wordlist in preparation by scholars from the People’s Republic of China and Hungary. After a preface on general questions, it deals with the glyphs beginning with a- and b- in the Khitan Small Script. This is followed by Khitan words beginning with the first two letters of the Latin alphabet. The aim of the paper is to open a discussion on a future Khitan Etymological Dictionary.

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The present study tries to elucidate how the Hebrew alphabet was used in different Karaim manuscripts. Religious and secular texts in all Karaim varieties provide a basis for the comparison. Since a comprehensive description of the relevant orthographic features would exceed the limits of this paper, only two of the most debated characteristics, namely the writing of the e and k sounds, will be discussed here. An analysis of numerous manuscripts makes it possible to provide a general description of certain tendencies and preferences in the use of certain letters or letter combinations in each Karaim variety.

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The paper examines a pilgrimage to the Holy Land and Egypt in 1483 that led to the publication of the remarkable incunable Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam (1486) by Bernhard von Breydenbach, which included the very first printed Coptic alphabet. Drawing attention to the influence this book exerted in the 15th and 16th centuries, the paper argues for regarding Breydenbach's publication as the initiator of Coptic studies in Europe. Utilising three further accounts of the same pilgrimage (published in 1556, 1843-6, and 1892), it also surveys how the pilgrims perceived the monuments of Ancient Egypt.

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In 1688, the inhabitants of Catholic towns and territories in Bulgaria rebelled against the Turks. A part of these people settled in the Bánát area in Hungary. They were allowed to found schools and print books in Bulgarian. These books were published first in the Latin alphabet in complex-letter Hungarian and Kajkavian Croatian orthography, then in diacritical Croatian spelling. Their historical significance is manifested by the fact that the authors of these books gave the local Bulgarian dialect literary status and, showing an example to follow, moved away from the conservative Cyrillic-letter Old Church Slavonic which had been in use for centuries and largely departed from the vernacular.

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The author gives a philological background of the enigmatic Chagatai planet name Saqït (sic!) ~ Sekit 'Mars', which goes back to the planet name Sevit 'Venus' in Qutad?u Bilig. The noun Saqït has a clerical error, which can be connected with the punctuation put above the "qaf" letter with three dots in the text of the QB, written with Arabic alphabet. The planet name of Rab?uzi stands for another planet, because Rab?uzi did not know well the Turkic starry sky. Further the author demonstrates the forms Saqïq (sic!) 'Venus' (in Rab?uzi and Šejx Sulejman efendi's Dictionary) and Turkish Sakit 'Mars'.

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