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peripheral circulations: longterm results in an animal model using the TriMaxx stent. J. Vasc. Surg. 45 , 821–827. Schwartz L. B. Comparison of the vascular responses to balloon

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European Journal of Microbiology and Immunology
Authors: M. Pásztói, P. Misják, B. György, B. Aradi, T. G. Szabó, B. Szántó, M. Cs. Holub, Gy. Nagy, A. Falus, and E. I. Buzás

.C. Steere 1988 An animal model for Lyme arthritis Ann N Y Acad Sci 539 264 – 273 . 52. E

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Despite many different trials, no effective dietotherapy exists for curing enormous weight loss caused by malignant diseases yet. The present study was aimed at determining in an animal model, weather some natural products might be included in the dietotherapy of cancerous patients with cachexia. Tumour was transplanted into Fischer 344 rats drinking either seabuckthorn extract, green tea, deuterium depleted water, trace elements preparation, fruits’ extract or multivitamin solution. Weight loss, tumour growth and expression of Ha-ras gene were determined. All the investigated natural products have significantly decreased tumour growth, and trace elements preparation has significantly decreased weight loss. Green tea, seabuckthorn extract and deuterium depleted water have notably diminished Ha-ras gene expression. Our results suggest that these natural products may be useful in inhibiting tumour growth, and some of them may be applied in the dietotherapy of cancer-related weight loss.

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corticosterone and models of human depression? Neurotox. Res . 13 , 85 – 96 ( 2008 ) 31. Oláh A , Betlehem J , Müller A , Józsa R : Possible application of animal models for the long-term investigation of shift work of healthcare

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( 1963 ): Germfree life and gnotobiology . Academic Press–New York. pp. 1 – 497 8. Al-Asmakh M , Zadjali F : Use of germ-free animal models in

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Rajčáni, J., Kúdelová, M.: Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4): An animal model for human gammaherpesvirus research. In Minarovits, J. et al. (eds): Latency Strategies of Herpesviruses. Springer, 2007, pp. 102–136. Melendez

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Danica Matusovits, Zsuzsanna Suba, D. Takács, Kinga Turzó, K. Donath, and A. Fazekas

The aim of this pilot investigation was to develop a new animal model for studying the effects on osteogenesis of agents used in the guided bone regeneration technique. As test material, a mixture of two osseoconductive materials with different physico-chemical characteristics was used. One component of the mixture was Bio-Oss, a bovine hydroxyapatite; the other was Cerasorb, a synthetic tricalcium phosphate. The mixture consisited of 50 volume percent of Bio-Oss and 50 volume percent of Cerasorb. In in vivo pilot experiment, bone wounds were prepared in the proximal third of both femurs of rabbits. A Cerasorb + Bio-Oss mixture was inserted on the test side and the same amount of sterile buffered physiological solution on the control side. After healing for 4 weeks, the bone segments were embedded and cut without decalcification, using the Exact cutting and grinding system. The density of the newlyformed bone was evaluated histomorphometrically. On the Cerasorb + Bio-Oss test side the bone density was almost 1.5 times higher than that on the control side. These results demonstrated that the applied animal model is appropriate for investigation of the effects on osteogenesis of biocompatible graft materials such as Bio-Oss and Cerasorb.

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Abstract  

Element concentrations in biological tissues of Dmdmdx/J and C57BL/6 J mice strains were determined using the neutron activation analysis technique. Samples of whole blood, bones and organs (heart and muscle) of these strains were irradiated in the IEA–R1 nuclear reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil). To perform this investigation biological samples of two-month-old adult females (n = 10) and males (n = 9) for Dmdmdx/J (dystrophic mice), and males (n = 12) for C57BL/6 J (control group), originally obtained from the Jackson Laboratory (Maine, USA) and further inbred at IPEN–CNEN/SP (São Paulo, Brazil), were used. A significant change was observed in the analysis of the heart of dystrophic mice suggesting that this dysfunction affects severely the heart muscle. These data may, in the future, contribute to the healthcare area, in veterinary medicine and in the pharmaceutical industry allowing the evaluation of the best procedures in diagnosis, treatment and investigations of neuromuscular diseases (muscular dystrophy) of patients through the use of animal models.

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528 535 Chatzigeorgiou A, Halapas A, Kalafatakis K, Kamper E: The use of animal models in the study of diabetes mellitus. In Vivo 23, 245–258 (2009) Kamper E. The use of animal models in

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Abstract  

Bleomycins (BLMs; BLM, A2, and B2) were labeled with 131I and radiopharmaceutical potentials were investigated using animal models in this study. Quality control procedures were carried out using thin layer radiochromatography (TLRC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and liquid chromatography (LC/MS/MS). Labeling yields of radiolabeled BLMs were found to be 90, 68, and 71%, respectively. HPLC chromatograms were taken for BLM and cold iodinated BLM (127I-BLM). Five peaks were detected for BLM and three peaks for 127I-BLM in the HPLC studies. Two peaks belong to isomers of BLM. The isomers of BLM were purified with using HPLC. Biological activity of BLM was determined on male Albino Wistar rats by biodistribution and scintigraphic studies were performed for BLMs by using New Zelland rabbits. The biodistribution results of 131I-BLM showed high uptake in the stomach, the bladder, the prostate, the testicle, and the spinal cord in rats. Scintigraphic results on rabbits agrees with that of biodistributional studies on rats. The scintigraphy of radiolabeled isomers (131I-A2 and 131I-B2) are similiarly found with that of 131I-BLM.

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