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[ 2–4 ]. Genome of K. pneumoniae has a certain flexibility and variability to take up and to accumulate antibiotic resistance genes as well as virulence factor determinants [ 1 ]. Development of multiresistant strains has an ongoing tendency. It has

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. , Atkinson , T. P. and Dybvig , K. ( 2020 ): Mycoplasma genitalium biofilms contain poly-GlcNAc and contribute to antibiotic resistance . Front

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epidemiology 2000 Mezrioui, N., Oufdou, K.: Abundance and antibiotic resistance of non-O1 Vibrio cholerae

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; Buchanan et al., 2017 ). Antibiotic resistance is considered one of the greatest threats to global public health, and food security. The high mortality rate in listeriosis cases and the increase in multidrug resistance in foodborne pathogens necessitate

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, 23 ]. The aim of the present paper was to provide additional experimental results on the topic of potential relationships between the biofilm-forming capacity and the antibiotic resistance phenotype in Escherichia coli using in vitro methods (in

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Balázs Farkas
,
Eszter Ostorházi
,
Katinka Pónyai
,
Béla Tóth
,
Elmardi Adlan
,
László Párducz
,
Márta Marschalkó
,
Sarolta Kárpáti
, and
Ferenc Rozgonyi

Beeton, M. L., Chalker, V. J., Maxwell, N. C. és mtsai: Concurrent titration and determination of antibiotic resistance in Ureaplasma species with identification of novel point mutations in genes associated with resistance. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Tulay Elal Mus
,
Figen Cetinkaya
,
Recep Cibik
,
Gul Ece Soyutemiz
,
Husniye Simsek
, and
Nilay Coplu

In this study, the presence of genes responsible for the pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance profile of enterococci isolated from various foodstuffs of animal origin was investigated. The percentage prevalence of enterococci was 54.1% (203/375) and the average count was found to be 3.81 log cfu/ml-g. Species-specific primers revealed Enterococcus faecalis as the predominant species carrying one or more virulence-associated traits of efa, gelE, ace, esp and agg genetic markers. Only one E. faecium isolate (from milk) was positive for the esp gene. Regarding antibiotic resistance, the highest frequency of resistance was observed for tetracycline (21.7%), followed by quinupristin/dalfopristin (13.3%), ciprofloxacin (2.0%), penicillin (2.0%), linezolid (1.0%), ampicillin (1.0%), streptomycin (1.0%), and gentamicin (0.5%). Enterococcus faecalis showed a higher prevalence of antibiotic resistance than other enterococci. The percentage of multidrug resistance among the isolates was 3.4%. Twenty-nine E. faecalis isolates (26.6%) carrying one of the virulence-associated traits were at the same time resistant to at least one antibiotic. Our results show that foods of animal origin, including ready-to-eat products, may be reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci.

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Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most important causes of urinary tract infection (UTI). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and correlation of antibiotic resistance with virulence characteristics and genetic diversity in K. pneumoniae isolated from UTIs in Iran. Phenotypic tests and antibiotic susceptibility were carried out on the isolates. Detection of the virulence and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used for exploring the genomic relatedness. Hemolysin, biofilm, and hypermucoviscosity formation were observed in 87.1%, 86.4%, and 12.1% of isolates, respectively. The antibiotic resistance rate of K. pneumoniae isolates ranged from 12.1% for meropenem to 100% for amoxicillin. The prevalence of virulence genes ranged from 1.4% for cnf-1 to 100% for mrkD, fimH, kpn, and entB genes. In this study, 91.7%, 33.3%, and 4.2% of phenotypically ESBL-producers were positive for bla CTX-M, bla TEM, and bla SHV genes, respectively. An association was observed between the presence of traT, fyuA, or cnf-1 genes with antibiotic resistance. Two clone types were obtained by PFGE that indicate different K. pneumoniae clones in community- and hospital-acquired UTIs. The findings of this study are valuable in development of treatment strategies against UTIs in Iran.

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Besides the well-known O157:H7 clone causing enterohaemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome in Europe, Japan and North America, the number of Escherichia coli isolates with non-motile (NM) phenotype has considerably increased. We supposed that spontaneous antibiotic resistance mutation could cause this phenotypic change. To model our hypothesis we isolated rifampicin- (Rif) and ampicillin- (Amp) resistant mutants from E. coli O157:H7 prototype strains 7785 and EDL933. Among Rif r mutants we could isolate strains with no or reduced motility, while the Ampr mutants became hypermotile. The biochemical profile of the mutants had not changed but phage sensitivity and generation time of the mutants were altered. Among the representative strains we did not find polymorphism with Southern blot analysis and no polymorphism was found in the fliC gene of the mutants. The described characteristics have proven to be stable. In a mice virulence assay by intravenous infections the virulence of the derivatives was also found to be changed. In summary, we found that the antibiotic-resistant phenotype in E. coli O157:H7 was coexpressed with several other phenotypic changes including motility and virulence. It can be assumed that expression of the involved phenotypes may be under the influence of a common regulatory cascade. Further work is needed to identify the components and mechanism of this regulatory system.

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors:
Siriphan Boonsilp
,
Jędrzej Sikora
,
Kitwadee Rupprom
,
Sarper Acılıoğlu
,
Anchalee Homkaew
,
Daranee Nutalai
,
Uraporn Phumisantiphong
, and
Thanwa Wongsuk

important role in the pathogenesis of diseases by facilitating bacterial colonization, infection, and antibiotic resistance [ 16–18 ]. Generally, S. aureus infection is multifactorial because of the combined action of several virulence determinants [ 19

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