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Grenke, Arthur, “Archival Collections on Hungarian Canadians at the National Archives of Canada.” Hungarian Studies Review , 17 (Spring, 1990): 3–12. [For further information on the subject, see the same author’s “Hungarian Canadiana at the Archives

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supported my research, sharing with me her profound experience in archival matters. References Afyoncu , E. ( 2012 ): Balyos Raporları ve Osmanlı

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passed, this article aims to reconstruct attitudes towards and anxieties concerning the law, based on archival material preserved at the Vatican Archives, namely through letters exchanged between the Nunziature of Vienna and the Holy See, which are

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Abstract  

The thermal degradation of new, and artificially aged fine Ulster linen and archival linen specimens from 19th century paintings were compared using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Thermal degradation data from new and artificially aged linen were found to be similar in nature. Archival specimens showed a decreased major degradation temperature, an increase in char remaining at the end of the experiment and some evidence of a depressed glass transition temperature. These indicate natural ageing through chain scission. Evidence of a two-stage degradation process was observed in some archival specimens suggesting that an unknown additive was present.

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The article presents information concerning the New York Bartók Archives, as gleaned by the author from more than thirty years (1978–2011) of conversations with Benjamin Suchoff, his writings, and some other scholarly sources. Suchoff came into contact with Victor Bator, the executor and trustee of the Bartók estate, in 1953 as he was trying to locate the manuscripts he needed for his doctoral thesis on Bartók’s Mikrokosmos. Soon he became curator and, eventually, head of the New York Bartók Archives. The article describes Suchoff ’s career as editor, with references to the history of Bartók’s manuscripts, and to the major projects of the New York Bartók Archive such as the publication of Bartók’s works dedicated to Romanian, Turkish, Yugoslav, Hungarian, and Slovak folk music, his theoretical writings (Béla Bartók Essays), and some of his compositions (The Archive Edition series).

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Abstract  

This study aims to provide archiving research trends from the perspective of the field of library and information science using profiling analysis method. The LISA database has been selected as the representative database in the library and information science field, and articles have been searched via the keyword ‘archiv*’. The analysis methods used in this study were the journal profiling method and the descriptor profiling method. The descriptor profiling method presents descriptors as a bag of words. That is, it represents descriptors according to the word sets which are included in the documents in which those descriptors are assigned. As a result of journal analysis, six representative journals which are closely related to archiv* have been identified. The six journals were Archivaria, Advanced Technology Libraries, Journal of the Society of Archivists, American Archivist, Archifacts, and Records Management Bulletin. The results of descriptor analysis show that the most comprehensive and core subject was digital libraries, and the most comprehensive and core object was the electronic media. Another result of detailed analysis shows that the outstanding objects were publications, special collections/sound, cultural heritage, television, image/photographs, internet/bibliographic data, and DB/newspapers. On the other hand, outstanding subjects were Archives, National Libraries, Universities, Libraries and companies.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Politimi Valkimadi, Drosos Karageorgopoulos, Harissios Vliagoftis, and Matthew Falagas

Abstract  

English is becoming the international language in numerous fields of human civilization. We sought to evaluate the extent of use of English in the field of biomedical publications. We searched in PubMed for the number of articles written in the 57 indexed languages, during each one of the four past 10-year periods. The extent of use of English as the publication language of articles included in PubMed has gradually risen from 62.3% of the total number of indexed articles between 1967–1976, to 74.0% between 1977–1986, 83.4% between 1987–1996, and reached 89.3% in the period between 1997–2006. The percentage of articles written in each one of the other languages was less than 1.6% for the period of 1997–2006. Apart from English, only the percentage of articles written in Chinese has risen between 1967–1976 and 1997–2006 (from 0.05% to 1.49%). In conclusion, the dominance of English in biomedical publications archived by the most commonly used database is impressive and increasing. This fact may have several consequences, favourable or not, in various aspects of scientific production.

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Institute of Afghanistan Studies ; Mrs. Masuma Nazari, Directress, National Archives of Afghanistan ; Ahmad Seyar Behroz, the chief archivist, historical documents section at the National Archives ; and to Salman Ali Oruzghani and Ali Baba Awrang for

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Digital storage and retrieval of texts has been in the focus of an entire branch of contemporary literary studies. Literary texts online meant a new step, allowing readers to access (and editors to build and modify) the corpus in a radically new way, via the Internet. A recent development, however, the era of the network (with its “community sites” and all the different interactive communications between users) raises quite new issues. In addition to problems of archiving, accessibility and connectibility, the issues of literature produced and received on the Internet came to the fore, and deserve interest and theoretical reflection in their own right. In this study, some cases from the Hungarian internet scene concerning the temporality, authorial position, collective production, etc. are described, in order to call for a more systematic and thorough survey of these phenomena in general.

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Summary  

Universality through standardization is at the heart of scientific and medical practices. In this study we dealt with the meaning, significance, and implications of standardization through “operationalization” in psychiatric diagnostic criteria by focusing on the effects of the DSM (Diagnostic Statistical Manual) III.  What does “operational” mean?* The discussion of “operationalization” in psychiatric diagnosis poses quite a challenge. Given the importance of semantics and the word networks of everyday life in forming descriptions of symptoms and reaching clinical judgments, cultural differences in these semantics inevitably have strong impacts on psychiatric diagnosis. The link between sensitivity and semantics in words enhances this effect. In spite of the difficulties in approaching operationalization in psychiatric diagnosis, several attempts have been made to standardize diagnostic criteria. Prominent examples include the DSM of the American Psychiatric Association and the ICD (International Disease Classification) of the WHO. In this paper we analyzed the effects of standardized diagnostic criteria by performing a content analysis of papers published in the Archives of General Psychiatry from 1978 to 1990. Our results clearly show changes in the research questions, research designs, methodologies, target diseases, and selections of independent and dependent variables.

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