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These investigations proved that aromatic plants from Croatia like lavander, laurel, rosemary and thymus, had insecticidal activity against Sitophilus granarius L on stored wheat.

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Abstract  

The paper analyses 2339 research papers appearing in 330 journals covered in Medicinal and Aromatic Plants Abstracts, India (1983) on the basis of their broad subject fields such as agronomy, phytochemistry, pharmacology and clinical research; their country of origin; plant genera and their species; and by type of investigation. Under each of the broad subject fields and major genera, an attempt has been made to identify the nature and focus of research in different countries through minimal level content analysis. Special focus of the paper has been the analysis of Indian publication output.

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Abstract  

Trace elements, essential oil yield and its percentage composition were determined by neutron activation analysis, hydrodistillation and gas chromatography in two chemotypes ofOriganum vulgare L. cultivated in the same field. Statistical tests such as analysis of variance, correlation coefficient,t-test, and multiple correlation were applied. The results showed that the samples contain the highest recorded oil yield for aromatic plants. Also, there is a statistically significant difference between the chemotypes of the plant not only in the predominant compound but in a number of other components. Iron, chromium and scandium showed a negative significant correlation with carvacrol and a positive one with thymol. Europium shows characteristic correlations with chromium, cobalt, iron and scandium within each chemotype of the plant. These correlations could make probable a role of this element in the biosynthesis of the predominant compounds.

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Medicinal and Aromatic Plants for Human Welfare. (3-7 February, 2003) Chiang Mai, Thailand. Abstracts, p. 374. Inhibitory effect of Origanum vulgare L. and Peumus boldus Mol. essential oils on enterobacteriaceae and an

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( link ) ietswaart ). doctoral thesis, department of medicinal and aromatic plants, szent istván university, budapest.

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C.K. Atal, B.M. Kapur , Cultivation and utilization of Aromatic plants, Regional Research Laboratory, Jammu-Tawi, CSIR (India) (1982). Kapur B

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The content and composition of active ingredients and essential oils in medicinal and aromatic plants have been studied for several decades. The volatile compounds in essential oils have been analysed routinely using gas chromatography (GC) since 1966, and with GC coupled to mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS) since 1978.The 13 rose varieties selected for chemical analysis varied for colour, shape and fragrance. The static headspace solid phase microextraction (sHS-SPME) technique recently developed for sample preparation and sample enrichment was used to study the volatile aromatic components.The main volatile compound of a sweet-smelling purple rose was found to be phenyl ethyl alcohol (33–52%). The phenyl ethyl alcohol content of fragrant rose flowers with blackish-purple petals increased continuously from early summer to late autumn (from 17 to 70 %). The dominant aromatic components of the yellow, orange and pink rose flowers were hexanol, hexenyl acetate and benzyl alcohol. Phenyl ethyl alcohol and orcinol dimethyl ether were the main constituents of the fragrant pink and white rose varieties. Methyl vinyl anisol and orcinol dimethyl ether were dominant in rose flowers with beige petals. In summary, it can be concluded that the SPME-GC/MS method is suitable for the characterization of rose varieties and for the chemical analysis of aromatic volatile compounds.

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A cogent medicinal and aromatic plant, Ziziphora clinopodioides (Lamiaceae) is a perennial herb, its aerial parts is used as a wild vegetable or additive in foods to proffer pleasant aroma and flavour. There are many discussions about the intraspecific classification of this species and several subspecies have been introduced for it in different flora. These subspecies are morphologically very similar and identification of them is very difficult and in some cases, impossible. Therefore, in the present study, the pollen grains morphology of nine subspecies (32 specimens) of Z. clinopodioides were probed and documented in details utilising the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In total, eleven pollen morphological characteristics were investigated and analysed by PAST software. The obtained results showed that pollen grains were hexacolpate and their equatorial views were sub-oblate to prolate. The exine ornamentation types of the pollen grains are bireticulate, microreticulate, reticulate and bireticulate-reticulate. The ANOVA test did not show significant difference for the studied quantitative traits. Although, the results of the multivariate analysis revealed a high diversity amongst the specimens even in the specimens of a single subspecies; it did not confirm the separation of subspecies in Z. clinopodioides.

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Summary

The essential oil and the volatile compounds of Salvia aucheri Boiss. var. mesatlantica Maire were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The volatile compounds were detected using headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) under optimized parameters. A comparative qualitative and quantitative study on the composition of the oils was carried out. For this, 38 compounds, constituting 95.40% of the oil, were identified in the essential oil by hydrodistillation (HD), and 32 compounds, representing 93% of the oil, were characterized by HS-SPME. The major components identified are camphor (49.80%, 51.80%), 1,8-cineole (9.50%, 9.40%), viridiflorol (8.80%, 1.40%), camphene (7.80%, 10.60%), α-pinene (2.90%, 4.50%), and p-cymene (1.50%, 2.40%) of essential oil and volatile compounds detected in HS-SPME, respectively. Quantitative but not qualitative differences have been found in the chemical composition of both analyzed samples depending on the extraction method. For these reasons, HS-SPME can be considered as an alternative technique for isolating volatiles from aromatic plants.

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and Y. Ebizuka , Medicinal and Aromatic Plants , Springer , 2002 , p. 44 . [9]. M. Waksmundzka-Hajnos J. Sherma

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