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Az európai összehasonlító statisztikai adatok alapján kidolgozott Penrose-törvény szerint inverz összefüggés van az egy országban található pszichiátriai ágyak száma és a börtönben lévő populáció létszáma között. Célkitűzés: A dolgozat a börtönpopuláció és az elmeosztályi ágyszám közötti összefüggéseket vizsgálja 1990 és 2005 közötti időszakban Magyarországon. Módszerek: Az adatok a Központi Statisztikai Hivatal kiadványaiból származnak. A dolgozatban a szerző az összefüggések leírására matematikai statisztikai módszereket alkalmaz. Eredmények: A pszichiátriai ágyak száma és a börtönpopuláció létszáma között Magyarország esetében is megfigyelhető inverz összefüggés van. A kényszergyógykezelt betegek száma a vizsgált időszakban a jogerősen szabadságvesztéses büntetésüket töltő személyek számával párhuzamosan emelkedett, és a pszichiátriai ágyak számával inverz összefüggést mutatott. Következtetések: Mind a börtön, mind pedig az elmeosztályon történő kezelés a közösség egy társadalmi jelenségre adott szegregációs válaszaként jelenik meg. Az adatok alapján feltételezhető, hogy mindkét rendszerben többségében ugyanazon populáció tagjaival találkozhatunk. A jelenség mélyebb összefüggéseinek elemzése céljából az országos vizsgálat elindítása szükségesnek tűnik.

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_Compilation_FI_EMN_Ad-Hoc_Query_safe_country_of_origin_050215.pdf> accessed 3 July 2017. European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights , Handbook on European law relating to asylum, borders and immigration (FRA 2014

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In September 1939, within a short span of time, Poland was attacked by Germany from the west and the Soviet army from the eastern borders. According to a previous diplomatic agreement, the Polish government fled to Romania. Noting these events, while resisting political and military constrictions, Hungary opened its borders to the fleeing Polish civilians and to members of the military force to offer refuge. In fact, more than a hundred thousand Polish citizens found asylum in Hungary at that time. At this historical point, Stanisława Rogińska and her daughter Halina Waroczewska fled from Warsaw, and after crossing the Hungarian border settled first at Szob, then moved to Klotildliget, Leányfalu, and finally to Keszthely at Lake Balaton. The writing, based on their memories, presents the dramatic moments of crossing the border and of getting established in those first difficult months. The memoir also illustrates the historically honoured Hungarian–Polish friendship, which at this time was forced by events outside of either nation’s control. It also illuminates the noblest pages of Hungarian history.

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The kidnapping on February 15, 1999 of the Kurdish leader Abdullah Öcalan outraged the Kurdish community in Germany, and the Kurdish-Kurdish conflict was translated onto the streets and schoolyards of a number of major German cities. The local and national authorities turned to the teachers to help them in the battle against racism and xenophobia. Several educators, in turn, had long before anticipated the problem and had written, translated, published books for the younger generation that address themselves to the problem of the “Other” generally; several books have also tried to answer the troubling question: “Where would you find Kurdistan on the map?” For the German reading public this question had been satisfactorily answered back in 1881 by the still popular travel writer Karl May. The urgency of the question, however, has been revived during the last two decades. The authors have written to inform and to rouse the interest and sympathy of their readers; they have also contributed to the inter-cultural and -religious dialogue that the German authorities deemed so necessary.

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relating to asylum seekers and refugees in UK. http://www.refugeecouncil.org.uk/glossary 3 Hatton, T. J.: Seeking asylum: Trends and policies in the OECD. Centre

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controls, as well as systematization and digitalization of asylum and migration policy. In the European context, mobility discourses tend to be reserved for the legitimized intra-European “free movement” of skilled workers, whereas migration discourses are

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A driving force in Vergil’s Aeneid is the hostility of Juno to the Trojans as they approach, and finally arrive in Italy. The epic in some ways mirrors the opposition encountered by Augustus as the new ruler of Rome. Juno’s opposition to the Trojans has its origin not only in Greek mythology, but in the history of the local peoples of Italy with whom early Romans had to contend. From the outset of the poem she becomes the personification of these opposing forces. Once the Trojans finally reach mainland Italy, she sets in motion a long war, although the one depicted in the Aeneid was not as long as the real wars Romans waged with the Latin League and with the many of the tribes of Italy, including the Veii. The reality of the wars Rome had to contend with are here compared to the relatively brief one depicted in the Aeneid, and the pacification of Juno reflects the merging of the different peoples of Rome with their subjugator.

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Abstract  

To estimate the status of selenium in seniors of the South Bohemia region, Czech Republic, 481 serum samples from seniors living in 17 Asylum Houses for seniors in the age between 60 and 99 years were obtained. Samples were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis with concurrent analysis of 4 reference materials for quality assurance. Average concentration of serum Se, arithmetic means in individual Asylum Houses, frequency distribution of serum Se concentrations as well as five years running monitoring of serum Se concentrations of one group of seniors proved selenium deficiency of the elderly population of the region South Bohemia.

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The author suggests new etymologies for two well-known Old Russian proper names. The god name of Simarĭglŭ/Semarĭglŭ is loaned from East Iranic (Scytho-Sarmatian) of the Alanic Caucasian period and corresponds to Ossetic xī/xe ‘oneself’ and maræg ‘murderer; killing’, xemaræg ‘suicide (person)’ and the Russian participle suffix -l-. The motive of god’s suicide is extended in mythology, including the Nart epic. The ethnonym Khinova mentioned in “The Tale of Igor’s campaign“ is of Baltic origin and comes from IE *skū-n- ‘asylum, shelter; shield, etc.’ and the suffix -ava/-uva, very frequent in the Baltic ethnonymics.

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, Jane , The Refugee in International Law ( 3 rd edition, Oxford University Press 2007 ) Gyeney , Laura and Molnár , Tamás , ‘The Immigration and Asylum Policy of the European

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