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Learning & Perception
Authors:
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Tamás M. Bőhm
,
Orsolya Szalárdy
,
Robert Mill
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 4, 380–387. Bregman, A. S. (1990): Auditory scene analysis. The perceptual organization of sound. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA. Bregman

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rivalry reveals a fundamental role of noise. J Vis, 6 (11), 1244–1256. Bregman, A. S. (1990): Auditory Scene Analysis, MIT Press. Bregman, A. S., Ahad, P. A., et al. (2000): Effects of time intervals

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Learning & Perception
Authors:
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Tamás M. Bőhm
,
Orsolya Szalárdy
,
Robert Mill
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

Sound sources often emit trains of discrete sounds, such as a series of footsteps. Previously, two different principles have been suggested for how the human auditory system binds discrete sounds together into perceptual units. The feature similarity principle is based on linking sounds with similar characteristics over time. The predictability principle is based on linking sounds that follow each other in a predictable manner. The present study compared the effects of these two principles. Participants were presented with tone sequences and instructed to continuously indicate whether they perceived a single coherent sequence or two concurrent streams of sound. We investigated the influence of separate manipulations of similarity and predictability on these perceptual reports. Both grouping principles affected perception of the tone sequences, albeit with different characteristics. In particular, results suggest that whereas predictability is only analyzed for the currently perceived sound organization, feature similarity is also analyzed for alternative groupings of sound. Moreover, changing similarity or predictability within an ongoing sound sequence led to markedly different dynamic effects. Taken together, these results provide evidence for different roles of similarity and predictability in auditory scene analysis, suggesting that forming auditory stream representations and competition between alternatives rely on partly different processes.

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Learning & Perception
Authors:
Tamás M. Bőhm
,
Lidia Shestopalova
,
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Andreas G. Andreou
,
Julius Georgiou
,
Guillame Garreau
,
Philippe Pouliquen
,
Andrew Cassidy
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

). Spatial Hearing . Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. Bregman, A. S. (1990). Auditory Scene Analysis . Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. Denham, S. L., Gyimesi, K., Stefanics, G., Winker, I. (2013

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The auditory two-tone streaming paradigm has been used extensively to study the mechanisms that underlie the decomposition of the auditory input into coherent sound sequences. Using longer tone sequences than usual in the literature, we show that listeners hold their first percept of the sound sequence for a relatively long period, after which perception switches between two or more alternative sound organizations, each held on average for a much shorter duration. The first percept also differs from subsequent ones in that stimulus parameters influence its quality and duration to a far greater degree than the subsequent ones. We propose an account of auditory streaming in terms of rivalry between competing temporal associations based on two sets of processes. The formation of associations (discovery of alternative interpretations) mainly affects the first percept by determining which sound group is discovered first and how long it takes for alternative groups to be established. In contrast, subsequent percepts arise from stochastic switching between the alternatives, the dynamics of which are determined by competitive interactions between the set of coexisting interpretations.

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Learning & Perception
Authors:
Tamás M. Bőhm
,
Lidia Shestopalova
,
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Andreas G. Andreou
,
Julius Georgiou
,
Guillame Garreau
,
Philippe Pouliquen
,
Andrew Cassidy
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

The human auditory system is capable of grouping sounds originating from different sound sources into coherent auditory streams, a process termed auditory stream segregation. Several cues can influence auditory stream segregation, but the full set of cues and the way in which they are integrated is still unknown. In the current study, we tested whether auditory motion can serve as a cue for segregating sequences of tones. Our hypothesis was that, following the principle of common fate, sounds emitted by sources moving together in space along similar trajectories will be more likely to be grouped into a single auditory stream, while sounds emitted by independently moving sources will more often be heard as two streams. Stimuli were derived from sound recordings in which the sound source motion was induced by walking humans. Although the results showed a clear effect of spatial separation, auditory motion had a negligible influence on stream segregation. Hence, auditory motion may not be used as a primitive cue in auditory stream segregation.

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Blevins, Juliette — Andrew Garrett 2004. The evolution of metathesis. In: Hayes et al. (2004, 117–156). Bregman, Albert S. 1990. Auditory scene analysis. The perceptual organization of

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Learning & Perception
Authors:
Orsolya Szalárdy
,
Alexandra Bendixen
,
Dénes Tóth
,
Susan L. Denham
, and
István Winkler

–23. Bregman, A. S. (1990): Auditory Scene Analysis: The Perceptual Organization of Sound. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA. Bregman, A. S., Abramson, J., Doehring, P., Darwin, C. J. (1985): Spectral integration based on common amplitude

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Szinuszhullámú és amplitúdómodulált beszéd észlelésének vizsgálata Magyar mondatok segítségével

Perception of sine-wave and amplitude-modulated sentences in Hungarian

Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle
Authors:
Zoltán Jakab
,
Gabriella Nagyné Ringer
,
Julianna Víg
, and
Pál Tamás Szabó

experimental psychology. Human perception and performance , 37 ( 5 ): 1607 – 1616 . Bregman , A. S. ( 1990 ). Auditory Scene Analysis . Cambridge Mass : The MIT Press

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. W. ( 2001 ). Bottom-up and top-down influences on auditory scene analysis: evidence from event-related brain potentials . Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance , 27 , 1072 – 1089

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