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., Singh, U. P. (1992) Morphometric changes in the ovaries of Indian vespertilionid bat, Scotophilus heathi with reference to delayed ovulation. Eur. Arch. Biol. 103 , 257-264. Morphometric changes in the ovaries of Indian

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Viktor Molnár, Máté Jánoska, Balázs Harrach, Róbert Glávits, Nimród Pálmai, Dóra Rigó, Endre Sós, and Mátyás Liptovszky

, A. L. (1953): Effect of herpes simplex virus (Strain 38) in the cave bat ( Myotis lucifugus ). Am. J. Vet. Res. 14 , 487–488. Brueckner A. L. Effect of herpes simplex

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Márton Z. Vidovszky, Claudia Kohl, Sándor Boldogh, Tamás Görföl, Gudrun Wibbelt, Andreas Kurth, and Balázs Harrach

paramyxoviruses from pteropid bat urine . J. Gen. Virol . 96 , 24 – 3 . Benko , M. and Harrach , B. ( 2003 ): Molecular evolution of adenoviruses . In: Doerfler , W. and Böhm P

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J Zool. 14 220 223. Keegan, D. J. (1980) The lack of active glucose transport system in the bat

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Krisztin Szőke, Attila D. Sándor, Sándor A. Boldogh, Tamás Görföl, Jan Votýpka, Nóra Takács, Péter Estók, Dávid Kováts, Alexandra Corduneanu, Viktor Molnár, Jenő Kontschán, and Sándor Hornok

, 709 – 713 . Hamilton , P. B. , Teixeira , M. M. G. and Stevens , J. R. ( 2012 ): The evolution of Trypanosoma cruzi : the ‘bat seeding’ hypothesis . Trends Parasitol. 28

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Abhilasha, Krishna, A. (1997) Adiposity and androstenedione production in relation to delayed ovulation in the Indian bat, Scotophilus heathi. Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 116, 97

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Brigitta Zana, Gábor Kemenesi, Péter Urbán, Fanni Földes, Tamás Görföl, Péter Estók, Sándor Boldogh, Kornélia Kurucz, and Ferenc Jakab

. , Cervantes-Gonzalez , M. , Guigon , G. , Thiberge , J. M. , Vandenbogaert , M. , Maufrais , C. , Caro , V. and Bourhy , H. ( 2014 ): A preliminary study of viral metagenomics of French bat species in contact with humans: identification of new

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Bartók’s American estate dates its origins to 1943, when he entrusted his music manuscript collection to the care of two fellow Hungarian emigrés, Gyula Báron and Victor Bator, both then living in the United States. After his death in 1945 the estate devolved into their care, in accord with the legal provisions of the will. For the next 22 years it was carefully managed by Bator, a lawyer and businessman who lived in New York City for the rest of his life. The onset of Cold War politics in the late 1940s presented numerous challenges to the estate, out of which emerged the tangled thicket of rumor, litigation, misunderstanding, confusion, and personal animosity that has been the American Bartók estate’s unfortunate legacy since the 1950s.As one of Hungary’s most significant cultural assets located outside the country’s borders, the American Bartók estate has since 1981 been under the control and careful supervision of Peter Bartók, now the composer’s only remaining heir. All but forgotten is the role Victor Bator played in managing the estate during the difficult years after World War II, when its beneficiaries became separated by the Iron Curtain, setting in motion legal and emotional difficulties that no one in the immediate family could have predicted. Equally overlooked is the role he played in enhancing the collection to become the world’s largest repository of Bartók materials.A considerable amount of Bator’s personal correspondence related to the early years of the Bartók estate has recently come to light in the U.S. Together with U.S. court documents and information gleaned from recent interviews with Bator’s son, Francis Bator, still living in Massachusetts, and the late Ivan Waldbauer, we can now reconstruct with reasonable accuracy the early history of Bartók’s estate. A strikingly favorable picture of Bator emerges. Bartók, it turns out, chose his executors wisely. A cultivated and broadly learned man, by the late 1920s Victor Bator had gained recognition as one of Hungary’s most prominent legal minds in the field of international business and banking law. His professional experience became useful to the Bartók estate as the Communist party gradually took hold of Hungary after World War II, seizing assets and nationalizing property previously belonging to individual citizens. His comfort in the arena of business law also thrust him into prominence as a public advocate for increased fees for American composers in the late 1940s - a matter of tremendous urgency for composers of serious music at the time. By reconstructing Bator’s professional career prior to 1943 his actions as executor and trustee become more understandable. We gain new insight into a figure of tremendous personal importance for Bartók and his family.

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Abstract  

One novel styrylpyridine derivatives(AV-45) coupled with 99mTc complex was synthesized. 99mTc-BAT-AV-45 was prepared by a ligand exchange reaction employing sodium glucoheptonate, and effects of the amount of ligand, stannous chloride, sodium glucoheptonate and pH value of reaction mixture on the radiolabeling yield were studied in details. Quality control was performed by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Besides the stability, partition coefficient and electrophoresis of 99mTc-BAT-AV-45 were also investigated. The results showed that the average radiolabeling yield was (95 ± 1%) and 99mTc-BAT-AV-45 with suitable lipophilicity was stable and uncharged at physiological pH.

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national articles. Graphics were produced with the lattice package (Sarkar 2008 ) and inferential statistics were based on linear mixed models (LMMs) using the lmer program ( lme4 package; Bates and Maechler 2010 ). Both packages are part of the R

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