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., Mancini, F., Montari, L., Nardini, M., Ghiselli, A. & Scaccini, C. (1998): Beer affects oxidative stress due to ethanol in rats. Dig. Dis. Sci. , 43 , 1332-1338. Beer affects oxidative stress due to ethanol in rats

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: B. Vecseri-Hegyes, P. Fodor, and Á. Hoschke

. Jakobsen, T. & Lie, S. (1982): Chelator in beer. J. Inst. Brewing , 88, 387-389. Chelator in beer J. Inst. Brewing 88 387

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References Baker , D. A. , Kirsop , B. H. ( 1973 ) Rapid Beer Production and Conditioning Using a Plug Fermentor . Journal of the Institute of Brewing , 79 ( 6 ): 487

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: Effects of beer and hop on ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors. J. Agric. Food Chem. 54, 2514–1519 (2006) Yoshinobu K. Effects of beer and hop on ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid

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Aoshima H, Takeda K, Okita Y, Sheikh Julfikar H, Koda H, Yoshinobu K: Effects of beer and hop on ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors. J. Agric. Food Chem. 54 2514–1519 (2006) Yoshinobu K. Effects of beer and hop on

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: B. Vecseri-Hegyes, P. Fodor, and Á. Hoschke

The most sensitive and time-consuming technological step of beer production is the fermentation of wort. Problems during fermentation will not only prolong production time but it will lead to the deterioration of beer quality. Most often it is due to low zinc concentration of the wort or the yeast. Due to lack of zinc the fermentation lasts longer, composition of fermentation by-products changes, maltose intake slows down, sedimentation ability and heat sensitivity of the yeast increase. In Part I of our work, the factors affecting the degree of zinc supply of wort were examined. During the examination of zinc supply of wort two kinds of beer were produced: all-malt beer and beer with adjunct. Change of zinc concentration was followed throughout the brewing process at every technological step. It was found that concentration of zinc gradually decreases during production of wort, and only a small fraction of the calculated amount appears in it. Wort made with adjunct has even lower zinc concentration than all-malt wort. In all malt wort 3.4%, while in wort containing adjunt only 0.4% of the zinc appeared in the wort. Yeast can absorb only the ionic form of zinc during fermentation, thus we had elaborated a method for the separation of the organic and inorganic form of zinc, which was followed by the determination of the concentration of ionic zinc in wort prior to fermentation.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors: J. Varga, R. Kiss, T. Mátrai, T. Mátrai, and J. Téren

Ochratoxin A is a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species. This mycotoxin is a common contaminant of various food products including cereal products, spices, dried fruits, coffee, beer and wine. Besides cereal products, beer and wine contribute significantly to ochratoxin exposure of humans. We examined the ochratoxin content of Hungarian wines and beers using an immunochemical technique. The detection limit of this technique is 0.01mg l-1. Altogether 65 wine and 25 beer samples were analysed. The presence of ochratoxin A was confirmed by HPLC in positive samples. Ochratoxin A was detected in 97.7% of wines, with ochratoxin concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.533mg l-1. The mean ochratoxin A concentration in wines was 0.110mg l-1. Only one of the Hungarian wines examined contained more than 0.5mg l-1ochratoxin A, the previously suggested EU limit for wine. Our data indicate that red wines are more frequently contaminated, and have higher mean ochratoxin contamination (0.117mg ml-1) than white wines (0.0967mg ml-1), in accordance with previous observations. A North-South gradient in wine ochratoxin concentrations is not evident from our data. For beers, all but one of the samples was found to be contaminated with small amounts of ochratoxin A with a mean concentration of 0.127mg l-1(range: 0.030-0.250mg l-1). Only one of the beers contained ochratoxin A above 0.2mg l-1, the anticipated European Community maximum allowable limit in beer. We could not detect correlation between the type and origin of beer and ochratoxin contamination.

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fermentable carbohydrate depletion in sorghum lager beers. J. Inst. Brewing , 110 , 124–132. Saldivar S. Effect of amyloglucosidase on wort composition and fermentable carbohydrate

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. 2008 111 187 191 EBC (2006): Extract of malt: congress mash (No. 4.5.1), (No. 8.4), Bitterness of beer (No. 9

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Summary

The quality of three types of beer (dark, light and non-alcoholic) was assessed using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry and chemometrics. An HPTLC separation of the polar beer components in the ethyl acetate extract was developed. The polar components were detected either by the in situ 2,2-diphenyl-1-pic-rylhydrazyl (DPPH*) assay or by derivatization with the Neu’s reagent, followed by the PEG solution. This directly allowed the visual comparison and evaluation of the phenolic/flavonoid or radical scavenging (antioxidative) beer profile. Although the three types of beer showed a very similar chemical HPTLC pattern, the signal intensities were different. Detected by the Neu's reagent, the dark beer extracts contained a high amount of phenolic compounds, and the light beer extracts showed a moderate content, while the non-alcoholic beer extracts had the lowest phenolic content. The HPTLC-DPPH* assay confirmed the higher radical scavenging activity of dark beer extracts, if compared to light and non-alcoholic beer extracts. The most active bands with regard to the radical scavenging property were identified to be desdimethyl-octahydro-iso-cohumulone and iso-n/ad-humulone. The use of pattern recognition techniques showed a clear differentiation between dark and non-alcoholic beer extracts, while light beer extracts did overlap with both beer types. This HPTLC screening allowed the (1) direct comparison of beer samples/types via classification and pattern recognition, (2) the assessment of the beer quality with regard to its antioxidative potential, and (3) the reference to single components.

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