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Authors: D. Kleiner, D. Kurucz, A. Bersényi, K. Szentmihályi, A. Skesters, L. Zuka and A. Blázovics

TAMPAR , F. & V EBERIC , R. ( 2012 ): HPLC-MSn identification and quantification of flavonol glycosides in 28 wild and cultivated berry species . Food Chem. , 135 , 2138 – 2146 . NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF PHARMACY ( 2003

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berries of Juniperus phoenicea L. grown in Egypt. Afr. J. Tradit. Complement. Altern. Med. , 4 , 417–426. Ali AM Chemical composition, cytotoxic activity and antimicrobial activity

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Authors: B. Pliszka, G. Huszcza-Ciołkowska, E. Januszewicz and I. Warmińska-Radyko

Kähkönen, M.P., Hopia, A.I. & Heinonen, M. (2001): Berry phenolics and their antioxidant activity. J. Agric. Fd Chem. , 49 , 4076–4082. Heinonen M. Berry phenolics and their

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.X. , Fei , L.H. , Xia , M.X. , Wu , D.Z. , Chen , S. & Wang , K.T. ( 2018 ): A study on different modes of disease resistance response induced by β-aminobutyric acid in grape berries . Food Science , 39 , 221 – 228 (in Chinese with English

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Longo, L. & Vasapollo, G. (2005): Anthocyanins from bay ( Laurus nobilis L.) berries. J. agric. Fd Chem. , 53 , 8063–8067. Vasapollo G. Anthocyanins from bay (Laurus

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Abstract  

Since 1987, a coniferous forest in Bavaria has continuously been monitored for radiocesium. About 350 soil samples and about 450 samples of different species of mushrooms and berry plants were analyzed for 134Cs and 137Cs. Based on this extensive data set a radioecological model for the long-term contamination of mushrooms and berry plants was developed. To keep the model as simple as possible without losing predictive power, it was especially designed to describe the vertical migration of radiocesium in forest soil, a key process which governs the temporal evolution of activity levels in mushrooms and berry plants.

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Authors: Maurizio Battino, Sara Tulipani, Franco Capocasa and Bruno Mezzetti

steps for assaying berry antioxidant features. BioFactors, 2005b, 23 , 221–227. Battino M. Total antioxidant capacity evaluation: critical steps for assaying berry antioxidant

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Abstract

The funerary monument of John, duke of Berry (1340–1416) was completed and erected in Bourges's Sainte-Chapelle upon the order of Charles VII, his heir general. The questions such tombs raise include some concerning construction and architecture, and – when they were demonstrably not bought ready-made or the extant written order is not restricted to general features usually only concerning the attire – the question of portraiture may also be deliberated in connection with 13–15th century gisants and funerary sculpted monuments. It is evident that Jean de Berry's tomb includes a portrait, but the finished tomb was not ordered in this form by Charles VII, nor was it envisaged by the carver of the effigy and the five alabaster mourners (pleurants) but it was probably designed by the duke himself in collaboration with André Beauneveu during his lifetime. Archival data support the attribution to Jean de Cambrai, but it was André Beauneveu, Duke Jean's contemporary and artistic adviser according to Froissart, the carver of portrait-like royal effigies, who drew up the exact design of the monument for Jean de Cambrai, who, in turn, took over Beauneveu's workshop and probably most of his commissions in the early 1400s. This is proven by the expensive and delicate material, white marble, of the lying effigy (the parts ordered to be completed by the king are of cheaper alabaster), the inscription of an unusual tone held by the gisant and the bear lying at the duke's feet. Although the bear was the grand seigneur's emblem, it was also more than that: it was an honoured pet of his mé-nage for decades and the companion of the duke towards the end of his life. A bear is unusual at this part of a tomb which usually features conventional animals (dog, lion). Here the relationship between human and the curled-up bear at his feet has an unusually intimate, personal overtone. The bear figure is also a portrait: it was not made with the impersonality of the correct but perfunctory adoption of the few available bear depictions (mostly in pattern books). The designer thus composed Jean de Berry's tomb with great care. A similarly spectacular heraldic device adorns the tomb of Margaret de Bohum (†1391), wife of Hugh de Courtney, Earl of Devon, in Exeter Cathedral, but the pair of swans is only a spectacular element and not an equivalent complement to the effigy portrait. There remained hardly any trace of the influence of a four-year stay in England in 1360–64 upon the young duke and art patron after the destruction of his buildings and treasury, but one thing is certain: he chose his heraldic devices in imitation of the English dukes. The origins of the swan-bear charges and the motto Le temps vendrá have not been explained satisfactorily yet.

Concerning the duke's heraldic animals, the first to refer to a strophe in Jean de Berry's nephew, King René d'Anjou's Livre du coeur d'amour épris is Guiffrey. After him everyone in the research literature explained the heraldic bear with this strophe which only mentions a cygne blanc navré, creating a beloved English dame, Miss Ursin (Urcin) from the name of the patron saint (Saint Ursin) of the new estate of John of France, the duchy of Berry and its capital city, Bourges.

In the duke of Berry's farewell, his last portraiture the bear is just as important an element as are the broad, coarse face of the grand seigneur, his band crown and ermine-lined mantle, as well as the motto that he presses to his shoulder with his never-aging, almost boneless hand.

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Summary  

We provide uniform rates of convergence in the central limit theorem for linear negative quadrant dependent (LNQD) random variables. Let \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $\{X_{n},\allowbreak n\ge1\}$ \end{document} be a LNQD sequence of random variables with \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $EX_{n}=0$ \end{document}, set \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $S_{n}=\sum_{j=1}^{n}X_{j}$ \end{document} and \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $B_{n}^{2}=\text{Var}\, (S_{n})$ \end{document}. We show that \begin{gather*} \sup_{x} \left|P\left(\frac{S_{n}}{B_{n}}<x\right)-\Phi(x)\right|= O\bigg(n^{-\delta/(2+3\delta)}\vee \frac{n^{3\delta^{2}/(4+6\delta)}}{B^{2+\delta}_{n}} \sum_{i=1}^{n} E{|X_{i}|}^{2+\delta}\bigg) \end{gather*} under finite \documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \usepackage{bbm} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $(2+\delta)$ \end{document}th moment and a power decay rate of covariances. Moreover, by the truncation method, we obtain a Berry--Esseen type estimate for negatively associated (NA) random variables with only finite second moment. As applications, we obtain another convergence rate result in the central limit theorem and precise asymptotics in the law of the iterated logarithm for NA sequences, and also for LNQD sequences.

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quality characteristics of berries pasteurized by heat treatment or high hydrostatic pressure as a function of storage temperature . PhD Thesis, Corvinus University, Budapest, pp. 63–74. Dalmadi I

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