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Sixty-one avian strains of Pasteurella multocida were characterised and compared by biochemical tests, capsular PCR typing and ERIC-PCR. The strains were recovered from various avian species (goose, duck, Muscovy duck, turkey, chicken and pheasant) and represented different geographic locations in Hungary. Forty-two strains (69%) were identified as P. multocida subsp. multocida and 19 strains (31%) as P. multocida subsp. septica . The strains were grouped into 7 different biovars (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7). The most prevalent biovars were 1 (25%), 3 (21%) and 6 (21%). Most of the duck isolates (90%) belonged to biovar 1 or 6. The most frequent capsular type was A (93.5%). Type F represented only a small number (6.5%) of the strains. Other capsular types were not identified. From the 61 isolates 24 different fingerprint patterns were generated by ERIC-PCR assay. Based on cluster analysis the strains could be grouped into four larger and four mini-clusters that showed considerable correlation with the geographical origin and the host species. The results indicate that ERIC-PCR may be a suitable technique for studying the host adaptation of P. multocida and the epidemiology of fowl cholera.

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A total of 146 Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from swine in Hungary in the last 20 years were examined. Biochemical characterisation and PCR-based techniques were used to determine species, subspecies, biovar, capsule type and presence of the toxA gene. Eighty-seven percent of the isolates belonged to P. multocida ssp. multocida , and 98% of these had biovar 3 or were trehalose-or lactose-fermenting or ornithine decarboxylase negative variants of that. Ten percent of the strains were P. multocida ssp. septica , and within this group 80% of the strains showed sorbitol-negative biovars (5, 6 and 7). The rest of the strains (20%) were lactose positive. Only 3% of the porcine isolates were P. multocida ssp. gallicida and 3 out of the 4 strains belonged to the dulcitol-fermenting biovar 8. Using a capsule-specific multiplex PCR, 60% of the strains belonged to capsule type D, 38% to capsule type A, and only 1 isolate had capsule type F. In contrast with data published in the literature, only 3% of capsule type D isolates carried the toxA gene, while this ratio was 41% for the type A strains. A remarkable regional distribution of toxA gene positive strains was observed. All but two isolates were found in swine herds located in the Transdanubian region, separated from other parts of Hungary by the river Danube.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Z. Cvetnic
,
M. Mitak
,
M. Ocepek
,
M. Lojkic
,
Svjetlana Terzic
,
Lorena Jemersic
,
Andrea Humski
,
B. Habrun
,
B. Sostaric
,
M. Brstilo
,
B. Krt
, and
B. Garin-Bastuji

This work presents the results of findings for brucellosis in wild boars and domestic swine in two regions of Croatia. In the region of Djakovo the blood samples of 211 wild boars were analysed and in 29.4% of the samples serologically positive reactions were established. In the same region the blood samples of 1080 domestic swine on pastures were also analysed and positive serological reactions were established in 12.3%. In the regions around Lonjsko Polje the blood samples of 53 wild boars were analysed and in 22.6% of them positive serological reactions were established. On several locations around Lonjsko Polje the blood samples of 901 domestic swine were serologically analysed and 13.5% of the swine were found to be seropositive. Bacteriological analyses of submitted materials from 24 wild boars resulted in isolation of Brucella from seven (29.2%) samples, and from 43 samples originating from domestic swine that had aborted and had been serologically positive, Brucella were isolated from 25 (58.1%) swine, as well as from 10 (62.5%) out of 16 aborted piglets. In all the isolates Brucella suis biovar 2 was identified. Wild boars are carriers and reservoirs of Brucella suis biovar 2 in Croatia.

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, septica and gallicida ), five capsular types (A, B, D, E and F), 16 somatic serotypes (1–16) and 13 biovars (1–10 and 12–14) ( Harper et al., 2006 ). The age, host species, immunity status, husbandry methods or wildlife–livestock interface can influence

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Tibor Magyar
,
Barbara Ujvári
,
Levente Szeredi
,
Norbert Virsinger
,
Ervin Albert
,
Zoltán Német
,
Edit Csuka
, and
Imre Biksi

This paper reports an outbreak of haemorrhagic septicaemia caused by Pasteurella multocida B:2 in beef calves, a disease that has not been described in the Hungarian literature since 1943, and has not been reported to the World Organisation For Animal Health (OIE) since 1970. Acute haemorrhagic septicaemia was confirmed in beef calves on one small farm, and was suspected on two further nearby holdings with concomitant unexplained losses. The source of the infection could not be determined. Apart from a short duration of depression and loss of appetite, the affected calves developed characteristic distal limb oedema. Gross findings in two calves submitted for laboratory examinations included subcutaneous oedema and haemorrhages on serous membranes, and in one case severe pharyngeal lymph node enlargement was observed. Histological examinations revealed lesions characteristic of septicaemia. Moderate to large amounts of Pasteurella antigens were detected in all organs tested by immunohistochemistry. Two isolates of P. multocida (Pm240, Pm241) were cultured from these cases and examined in detail. These were identified as P. multocida ssp. multocida biovar 3. Both were toxA negative and belonged to serotype B:2. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign these to a new sequence type (ST64) that is closely related to other haemorrhagic septicaemia causing strains of P. multocida regardless of the host.

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Barbara Ujvári
,
Levente Szeredi
,
László Pertl
,
Gergely Tóth
,
Károly Erdélyi
,
Szilárd Jánosi
,
Tamás Molnár
, and
Tibor Magyar

This is the first report of Pasteurella multocida type B in Hungarian pigs. This disease was observed in backyard-raised pigs in three households within a small area. Neither the source of the infection nor the epidemiological connection between any of the premises could be determined. The most consistent lesion was dark red discolouration of the skin of the ventral neck and brisket, with accompanying oedema and haemorrhages. The morbidity was low and lethality relatively high, with three dead (50%) and two euthanised (33%) out of six affected animals. A total of three isolates of P. multocida (P55, P56 and P57) were cultured from these cases and examined in detail. These were identified as P. multocida ssp. multocida biovar 3. All were toxA negative and belonged to serotype B:2. Multilocus sequence typing was used to assign these to a new sequence type (ST61) that is closely related to other haemorrhagic septicaemia causing strains of P. multocida regardless of the host. M13 polymerase chain reaction and virulence-associated gene typing also show that type B strains form a highly homogeneous, distinct phylogenic group within P. multocida.

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179 Chaudri, A. M., McGrath, S. P., Giller, K. E. (1992): Metal tolerance of isolates of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar trifolii from soil contaminated by post applications of

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production in Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae WSM710 involves exoR . Microbiology 143 , 1951–1958. Glenn A. R. Regulation of exopolysaccharide production in

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. Leal-Klevezas , D. S. , Martínez-Vázques , I. O. , García-Cantú , J. , López-Merino , A. , Martínez-Soriano , J. P. : Use of polymerase chain reaction to detect Brucella abortus biovar 1 in infected goats . Vet Microbiol 75 , 91 – 97

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, M. D., Ocana, A., Ligero, F., Lluch, C. (1996): Growth and symbiotic performance of faba bean inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar. viciae strains tolerant to salt. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. , 42 , 133

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