Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 323 items for :

  • "body mass index" x
Clear All
Authors: Solomon O. Ugoya, Mayowa O. Owolabi, Tokunbo A. Ugoya, Fabian H. Puepet, Godwins O. Echejoh and Adesola Ogunniyi

2003 26 2165 2173 Pinzur, M., Freeland, R., Juknelis, D.: The association between body mass index and

Restricted access

. 10. World Health Organization : Global database of body mass index . Available at: http://www.who.int/bmi/index.jsp . Accessed January 20, 2009 . 11. R

Restricted access

among New Zealand children: Associations with body mass index and related nutrition behaviors. J. Am. Diet. Assoc. , 107 , 570–576. Schaaf D. At-home breakfast consumption among New

Restricted access
Authors: Hannah R. George, Viren Swami, Piers L. Cornelissen and Martin J. Tovée

T.J. Cole 1997 Women's reproductive health: The role of body mass index in early and adult life International Journal of Obesity 21 432

Restricted access

.G., Striegel-Moore, R.H., Franko, D.L., Albertson, A.M. & Crockett, S.J. (2005): The relationship of breakfast and cereal consumption to nutrient intake and body mass index: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. J. Am. Diet

Restricted access
Authors: Á. Sziva, Zs. Mészáros, K. Kiss, M. Mavroudes, N. Ng and János Mészáros

Ekblom Ö, Oddsson K, Ekblom B: Physical performance and body mass index in Swedish children and adolescents. Scandinavian J. of Food and Nutrition 49, 172–179 (2006) Ekblom B. Physical

Restricted access

Aim: To analyse and compare the ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme), ACTN3 (actinin-3) and AMPD1 (adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1) genetic variants, oxygen uptake (VO2max), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) of elite high altitude mountaineers and average athletes. Methods: Elite Bulgarian alpinists (n = 5) and control group of athletes (n = 72) were recruited. VO2max was measured using a treadmill graded protocol. HR, BP and BMI were recorded. Genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Chi 2-test and Fisher’s exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Alpinists showed significantly higher frequencies of 60% ACE I allele (p = 0.002), 50% ACTN3 X allele (p = 0.032) and 30% AMPD1 T allele (p = 0.003) compared to controls — 39%, 36%, 13%, respectively. ACE ID genotype prevalence and null DD genotype were observed in mountaineers. Higher absolute VO2max, but no differences in VO2max ml kg−1 min−1, HR, oxygen pulse, blood pressure and BMI were found. Conclusions: The ID genotype and higher frequencies of ACE I allele could contribute to successful high altitude ascents in mountaineers. The genetic make-up of the two mountaineers who made the summit of Mt Everest was distinctive, revealing ACE ID genotype, mutant ACTN3 XX and AMPD1 TT genotypes.

Restricted access
Authors: Julianna Bircher, Eszter Kótyuk, Renáta Cserjési, Andrea Vereczkei, Zsolt Rónai, Mária Sasvári-Székely, Anna Székely and Géza Nagy

–748. 8 Frayling TM, Timpson NJ, Weedon MN, et al. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity. Science 2007; 316: 889

Open access

A. Constantinides 2005 The effects of body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio on ratings of female attractiveness, fecundity, and health Personality and Individual Differences

Restricted access
Authors: D. E. Re, V. Coetzee, D. Xiao, D. Buls, B. P. Tiddeman, L. G. Boothroyd and D. I. Perrett

1998 Optimum body-mass index and maximum sexual attractiveness Lancet 352 9127 548 548 . M. J

Restricted access