Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 424 items for :

  • "body mass index" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Hungarian Medical Journal
Authors:
Solomon O. Ugoya
,
Mayowa O. Owolabi
,
Tokunbo A. Ugoya
,
Fabian H. Puepet
,
Godwins O. Echejoh
, and
Adesola Ogunniyi

2003 26 2165 2173 Pinzur, M., Freeland, R., Juknelis, D.: The association between body mass index and

Restricted access

. 10. World Health Organization : Global database of body mass index . Available at: http://www.who.int/bmi/index.jsp . Accessed January 20, 2009 . 11. R

Restricted access

T.J. Cole 1997 Women's reproductive health: The role of body mass index in early and adult life International Journal of Obesity 21 432

Restricted access

Influence of gender on body mass index (BMI), eating habits and exercise frequency are evaluated in students attending a private university in Istanbul, Turkey. Males had a significantly higher mean BMI value. Among male students, 27.89% were overweight, and 6.11% were obese, while only 2.63% of females were overweight, and 0.87% were obese.Significantly higher percentage of females than males were underweight (23.70% versus 0.56%, respectively). Male students ate more in a typical day. Breakfast was the most often skipped meal for both genders. Females preferred to consume fruits and vegetables, whereas males preferred more meat and bread. Although the frequencies were significantly different, dairy consumption was low, and fast food and soda consumptions were high for both genders. The majority of university students were insufficiently active. Females were physically less active compared to males.

Restricted access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Afework Tsegaye
,
Joachim Bjørne
,
Anita Winther
,
Gyöngyi Kökönyei
,
Renáta Cserjési
, and
H.N. Alexander Logemann

( Corbetta & Shulman, 2002 ). Although studies have suggested that weight, or more specifically Body Mass Index (BMI; kg/m 2 ), is associated with attentional bias and disengagement, the exact relationship and role of (reward) context has not yet been

Open access

Aim: To analyse and compare the ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme), ACTN3 (actinin-3) and AMPD1 (adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1) genetic variants, oxygen uptake (VO2max), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) of elite high altitude mountaineers and average athletes. Methods: Elite Bulgarian alpinists (n = 5) and control group of athletes (n = 72) were recruited. VO2max was measured using a treadmill graded protocol. HR, BP and BMI were recorded. Genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Chi 2-test and Fisher’s exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Alpinists showed significantly higher frequencies of 60% ACE I allele (p = 0.002), 50% ACTN3 X allele (p = 0.032) and 30% AMPD1 T allele (p = 0.003) compared to controls — 39%, 36%, 13%, respectively. ACE ID genotype prevalence and null DD genotype were observed in mountaineers. Higher absolute VO2max, but no differences in VO2max ml kg−1 min−1, HR, oxygen pulse, blood pressure and BMI were found. Conclusions: The ID genotype and higher frequencies of ACE I allele could contribute to successful high altitude ascents in mountaineers. The genetic make-up of the two mountaineers who made the summit of Mt Everest was distinctive, revealing ACE ID genotype, mutant ACTN3 XX and AMPD1 TT genotypes.

Restricted access

This paper examines the effect of breakfast skipping on weight status and abdominal obesity in urban school children. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to all primary schools (n=18) in Óbuda, Budapest. A total of 3714 students (1860 boys, 1854 girls; age range: 7–15 years) were involved. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured. Data about obesity-related dietary habits (breakfast skipping, fruit and vegetable intake, number of meals, soft drinks consumption) were collected via self-administered questionnaire. One-fifth (21.3%) of the participants were regularly skipping breakfast. Frequency of regular breakfast decreased with age. Breakfast skipping was predictive for higher body mass index (BMI) and WC in a model that was adjusted for age, gender and all studied nutritional factors. Confirming these results, both BMI (19.3±4.0 vs. 18.1±3.7 kg m −2 ; P<0.001) and WC (67.3±12.0 vs. 63.9±10.8 cm; P<0.001) were higher among breakfast skippers than in breakfast eaters. Odds ratios for breakfast skipping for being obese or abdominal obese were 1.59 (95%CI: 1.12–2.26) and 2.04 (95%CI: 1.57–2.65), respectively. Although prospective studies are needed to verify the causality between breakfast skipping and obesity, our findings support the importance of promoting regular breakfast consumption among school children.

Restricted access
Physiology International
Authors:
Emilio Romero-Romero
,
Estela Guerreo De León
,
Juan Morán-Pinzón
,
Rigoberto Salado-Castillo
, and
Armando Castillo-Pimentel

. A bioelectric impedance scale with electrodes for hands and feet (Omron HBF-514C) was used to determine the percentages of body fat (TF%), visceral fat (VF%) and body mass index (BMI) (kg m −2 ). Subjects were classified by their BMI according to the

Restricted access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Julianna Bircher
,
Eszter Kótyuk
,
Renáta Cserjési
,
Andrea Vereczkei
,
Zsolt Rónai
,
Mária Sasvári-Székely
,
Anna Székely
, and
Géza Nagy

–748. 8 Frayling TM, Timpson NJ, Weedon MN, et al. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity. Science 2007; 316: 889

Open access

A. Constantinides 2005 The effects of body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio on ratings of female attractiveness, fecundity, and health Personality and Individual Differences

Restricted access