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The influence of seasonal variations on the chemical composition and composition of fatty acids in five commercially important freshwater fish species from the Danube: white bream, bream, vimba, zope, and Prussian carp, during May, July and September was determined. Changes in the chemical composition of meat of all examined species had the same tendencies. Water and protein content in the meat decreased, while fat content increased. The most frequent fatty acids in the meat of all the examined fish were the following: 18:1 n-9 (oleic), 16:0 (palmitic), 16:1 (palmitoleic), 18:2 n-6 (linoleic), 20:1 (eicosenoic), 20:5 n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 20:4 n-6 arachidonic acid and 22:6 n-3 docosahexaeonic acid (DHA). The content of saturated fatty acids (SFA) ranged from 25.03% to 32.43% and displayed a tendency to increase during the observed period. The total content of the n-6 group in the meat of Prussian carp was higher than in other species, which was probably a consequence of specific diet. The total content of n-3 fatty acids in the meat of white bream, bream, vimba and zope was the highest in May, and it declined during July-September. We can conclude that the meat of white bream and vimba contains high nutritional values in terms of EPA and DHA content. The n-3/n-6 ratio was also very favourable: 0.9 to 2.0 in the meat of white bream, bream, vimba and zope, with a clear downward tendency in the observed period.

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Myxobolus hungaricusJaczó, 1940 forms relatively large plasmodia on the gills of bream (Abramis brama). The authors give a redescription of this deficiently described parasite on the basis of spores collected from the original habitat, which spores are indicated as a neotype. The plasmodia of the parasite can be found on the gills typically in the spring months, and are located in the central part of the gill filaments. They start to develop in the lumen of capillaries of the secondary lamellae and remain in intralamellar location also after they have reached the mature stage. The spores have a very characteristic shape, as on the surface of the spore valves a distinctly emerging ridge runs parallel to the sutural line. In addition to breams from the typical habitat, Lake Balaton, the plasmodia ofM. hungaricuscould be detected also on breams originating from the river Danube.

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The fatty acid composition of wild sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) and gilthead sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) were compared with gas chromatography. These two species are widely cultivated in Europe and represent a significant portion of consumed fish in the region. The aim of the present work was to compare the nutritional value of fatty acids in the flesh of wild sea bass and sea bream. Significant differences were observed in the saturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid content. The presence of lauric, myristic and palmitic acids in the flesh of sea bream in quantities far exceeding those in sea bass make sea bream less suitable for preventing cardiovascular diseases. The poly-unsaturated n-3 fatty acids with both anti-atherogenetic and anti-inflammatory action in sea bass surpass those of sea bream by a total of 30%. Sea bass also contains 60% more C22:6n-3. Compared to sea bream, sea bass appears to be more suitable for the diet of people suffering from cardiac diseases, angiopathy, inflammations and Alzheimer’s disease.

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During a five-year survey including studies on the parasite fauna of bream (Abramis brama), four gill-parasitic Myxobolus species (M. bramae, M. hungaricus, M. impressus and M. macrocapsularis) were recorded in a total of 313 breams from Lake Balaton. The commonest species, M. bramae showed a prevalence of 33%, while the other species occurred sporadically. Myxobolus bramae and M. macrocapsularis infected the tips of the gill filaments and caused both intralamellar and interlamellar infection. Intralamellar plasmodia of small size developed in the capillary network of the gill lamellae whereas the much larger interlamellar plasmodia were formed in the arteria afferens. The intralamellar plasmodia of M. hungaricus always infected the basal or central part of the gill filaments. In contrast to the above species developing in the blood vessels, M. impressus proved to be an epithelial parasite, as its plasmodia always developed in the adjacent gill filaments of two opposite haemibranchia, in the stratified epithelium between the respiratory plates, causing changes of the haemibranchium which were well visible even by the naked eye.

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The negative samples of a collection, established originally for seeking new adeno- and herpesviruses in lower vertebrates, were screened for the pres-ence of circoviruses by a consensus nested PCR targeting the gene coding for the replication-associated protein. Six fish samples representing five species, namely asp (Aspius aspius), roach (Rutilus rutilus), common bream (Abramis brama), round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) and monkey goby (Neogobius fluviatilis), as well as three frog samples were found positive for circoviral DNA. Sequence analysis of the amplicons indicated the presence of three novel putative circo-like viruses and a circovirus in Hungarian fishes and one novel circovirus in a common toad (Bufo bufo), and another one in a dead and an alive specimen of green tree frog (Litoria caerulea), respectively. In phylogeny reconstruction, the putative bream circovirus clustered together with circoviruses discovered in other cyprinid fishes recently. Three other piscine circoviral sequences appeared closest to sequences derived from different environmental samples. Surprisingly, the nucleotide sequence derived from two fish samples (a bream and a monkey goby) proved to be from porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2), almost identical to a sequence detected in Sweden previously. This is the first report on the detection of PCV2 in fish and circoviral DNA in amphibian hosts.

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The present study demonstrates an application of Parallux™ (a solid-phase fluorescence immunoassay) for amoxicillin analysis in fish tissue. Amoxicillin at the recommended therapeutic dose (400 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered to three groups of 25 olive flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus ), 25 rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli ) and 25 red sea bream ( Pagrus major ) for 7 consecutive days. Amoxicillin was detected in the muscle of fish treated by the 3rd day of the withdrawal period. The recovery rates of all spiked muscle samples were > 86% of the spiked values. The present study showed that solid-phase fluorescence immunoassay can be easily adopted in predicting amoxicillin residues in the muscle tissue of farmed fish.

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Molnár, K. and Baska, F. (1999): Redescription of Myxobolus hungaricus Jaczó, 1940 (Myxospo-rea: Myxobolidae), a parasite of bream (Abramis brama L.). Acta Vet. Hung. 47, 341--349. Redescription of Myxobolus hungaricus Jaczó

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the gills of common bream ( Abramis brama L.) in Lake Balaton and in the Kis-Balaton reservoir, Hungary . Acta Vet. Hung. 47 , 419 – 432 . Shulman , S. S. ( 1966

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similar to that of Myxobolus hungaricus Jaczó, 1940. Re-description of M. hungaricus found in common bream Abramis brama (Hungary, Lake Balaton and the River Danube) showed that mature plasmodia were rounded or elliptical in shape, reaching 0

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Glogowski, J., Babiak, I., Kucharczyk, D., Luczynski, M., Piros, B. (1999) Some properties of bream Abramis brama L. sperm and its cryopreservation. Aquac. Res. 30 , 765–772. Piros B

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