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Anders, A.–Nagy, E. Gy. 2007 Late Neolithic burial rites at the site of Polgár-Csőszhalom-dűlő. In: Kozłowski, J.–Raczky, P. (eds): The Lengyel, Polgár and related cultures in the Middle/Late Neolithic in Central Europe

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Transdanubia. V. STATISTICAL DATA OF THE CEMETERY The rite of the cemetery The structure, the chronological determination, and ritual characteristics of the cemetery used for several generations are not simple. The following table contains the burial rite and

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Described in the study is a burial of the Sopot Culture. The solitary burial found on the settlement and its rich inventory of finds (vessels, a Spondylus pendant and beads) provides the springboard for an overview of the culture’s burial rite and grave goods as well as its cultural contacts. One of the unique traits of the burial is that it incorporates both the Linearbandkeramik traditions of the Transdanubian Sopot Culture and the typical finds of the Slavonian Sopot Culture.

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On the coins in the cemetery of the Hungarian commoners at Magyarhomorog-Kónyadomb . The Magyarhomorog-Kónyadomb cemetery, in which 540 graves of the Hungarian commoners were unearthed from the 10 th –12 th centuries, was the richest one in the Carpathian Basin in regard of coins: a hundred and ninety-nine coins were uncovered in 145 graves, mostly of adults, from the period between (Saint) Stephen I (1000–1038) and Stephen II (1116–1131). The majority of the coins were intact; two of them were folded in half. Coins cut to pieces were placed in 48 graves: the fragments either belonged to the same item or they were independent segments. They appeared in three functions in the burial rite: in clusters as perforated coin ornaments (3 graves of children), as burial obols in the mouth or the hands 69 graves and as diverse coin grave-goods 98 graves. The distribution of the graves with coins shows a relative chronology in concentric stripes, where the oldest ones are in the centre. The village that used the cemetery has not yet been identified.

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The paper offers a digression into the issue of a specific group of children in the Early Middle Ages – the children of the elite in the northern region of the Carpathian Basin. By means of analysis and evaluation of the grave goods, the elements of the burial rite of children’s graves, it is possible to detect certain distinctive phenomena that show the importance of child individuals of higher social class. In terms of archaeological material, it is shown to a large extent by analogical phenomena of the burials of adult elite individuals. The phenomena manifest themselves with certain deviations due to the effect of a different social and cultural-ethnic development.

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“Warrior Graves”? The Background of the Anglo-Saxon Weapon Burial Rite. Past&Present No. 126, 22–43. Härke, H. 1992 Angelsächsische Waffengräber des 5. bis 7. Jahrhunderts. ZfAM Beiheft 6. Härke, H

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Anders, A.–Nagy, E. Gy. 2007 Late Neolithic burial rites at the site of Polgár-Csőszhalom-dűlő. In: J. K. Kozłowski–P. Raczky (eds): The Lengyel, Polgár and related cultures in the Middle/Late Neolithic in Central Europe

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Anders, A.–Nagy, E. Gy. 2007 Late Neolithic burial rites at the site of Polgár-Csőszhalom-dűlő. In: J. K. Kozłowski–P. Raczky (eds): The Lengyel, Polgár and related cultures in the Middle/Late Neolithic in Central Europe

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Anders, A.–Nagy, E. 2007 Late neolithic burial rites at the site of Polgár-Csőszhalom-dűlő. In: Kozłowski, J.–Raczky, P. (eds): The Lengyel, Polgár and Related Cultures in the Middle/Late Neolithic in Central Europe. Kraków

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Alfödy 1959–1960 = G. Alföldy : Bronze Vessels in the Burial Rites of the Native Population in North Pannonia. Archaeologia (Warszawa) 11 (1959–1960) 1

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