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How far can canon and language be sources of (dis)continuity in literary history? Continuity and discontinuity are concepts of such complexity that only philosophers can hope to make a successful attempt to define them in general terms. All I can offer is a tentative analysis of their significance for literary history. Since even such an investigation would ask for a lengthy treatment if conducted on an abstract level, I shall limit myself to reflections on how continuity and discontinuity are related to the concepts of canon and language. In the second half of my paper a personified abstraction called nation will also be introduced with the intention of making some remarks on the legitimacy of the terms national and world literature. The essay also raises the question of whether it is possible to write literary history in a postmodern world.

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Perhaps best known as a peerless virtuoso in his day and a composer the significance of whose contributions to the Western tradition was only appreciated in the latter half of the 20th century, Ferenc Liszt was also among the most ambitious composers of the 19th century in his exposure to works of literature and his interest in the interactions of literature and music. The following article examines the interrelationships between his music and the works of literature he chose as inspirations and in some cases as texts to be put to music.

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References Altieri 1983 A ltieri Charles : An idea of a literary canon . Critical Inquiry 10 ( 1983 ): 37 – 60

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. Freud and Man’s Soul 1982 Bloom, Harold. The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages . New York: Harcourt Brace

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Abstract  

This article presents the findings of the first part of a research project on the Western canon and Israeli active cultural memory in the Digital Era. The article focuses on the methodological problems of mapping a national cultural memory from the angle of the use it makes of Western literary heritage. The detailed description of the mapping process—beginning with the construction of an initial list of relevant canonic texts and ending with the validation of three cultural “memes” (Don Quixote’s tilting the windmills, Hamlet’s contemplation of suicide, and Romeo and Juliet as the ultimate lovers) as the most appropriate matter for constructing multimedia hypertext educational threads, touches upon many aspects of Intertextuality and Cultural memory theories, and the positive and negative aspects of the Internet with respect to both.

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Canon’. The Harvard Theological Review Vol. 79. No. 1/3. 44–66. Davies W D Reflections on the Mormon ‘Canon’ The Harvard Theological Review

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In this paper an analysis is attempted of the triple suffering (duhkha-duhkhata, samskara-duhkhata, viparinama-duhkhata) as it appears in the Mahavyutpatti and in earlier sources. Comparing it to some non-buddhistic triads (e.g. in the Yoga-sutra) and similar concepts in the Pali Canon and its commentaries, a connection is suggested to the trilaksana (duhkha, anitya, anatman) and to the frequent series old age - disease - death. It appears that the original understanding of samskara-duhkhata was probably not the suffering related to subliminal impressions but rather the suffering inherent in anything of a composite nature.

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On the basis of archival research on the legacy of Bishop Josip Juraj Strossmayer (1815–1905) deposited in the Archives of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, and in documents kept at the Archives of the Diocese of Đakovo, the authors of this work present and complete what is known about the art collection of Canon Raffaele Bertinelli, which was purchased in 1878 by the Hungarian primate and archbishop of Ezstergom, János Simor, and which forms the basis of the Christian Museum in Esztergom. In the mid-1860s, Bishop Strossmayer learned of the art collection of Canon Bertinelli and started negotiations to purchase it. Although the sale never occurred, there is still a wealth of documentation related to the negotiations: letters of the bishop's loyal correspondent and advisor on questions of art Nikola Voršak, a list containing a description of each individual work of art from Bertinelli's collection (Sanguinetti, 1863), several letters discussing the value of the collection (by Overbeck, Minardi, Cochetti, and Consoni), and a personal letter from Bertinelli himself to Bishop Strossmayer. Not only are these documents an excellent example of the ways in which people did business, negotiated, and bought artwork in the second half of the nineteenth century, but they are also a source of interesting data and assumptions about the provenance of Bertinelli's collection and the reasons for its sale. These letters even provide us with the names of many other nineteenth-century collectors who showed an interest in buying the collection. Finally, the rich correspondence between Voršak and Strossmayer also contains information about another purchase made by János Simor.

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Translation and canon formation

The canonisation of Greek and Roman classics in Hungarian culture

Neohelicon
Author: Péter Hajdu
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