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1 La base de cet article est mon livre „Tiszta forrás” felé... Közelítések Bartók Béla és a Cantata profana világához [Vers la “source pure”… Réflexions sur le monde de Béla

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The first print of Joseph Haydn’s Stabat mater was the Schwickert piano-reduction from 1781. It includes only the German text by Johann Adam Hiller. Two years earlier Hiller brought his German version to its first performance at the university-church in Leipzig. He wanted to make this work known in Protestant churches of Germany, where Latin was “not appropriate”. The German text minimizes the reference to Mary and accentuates the Protestant-typical Christo-centrism. 1803 Breitkopf sets in the first print of the score both the Latin and the German text. Some different versions (for instance by Findeisen and Christmann) were also successful efforts adapting the work into the Protestant liturgy, like J. S. Bach did with Pergolesi’s Stabat mater . Indeed, some sources include choral settings between the original numbers, resembling the form of a typical Protestant church-cantata. Translations and adaptations were prerequisites of wide reception in Protestant parts of Middle and Northern Germany, where the requirement of sophisticated passion-music in form of cantatas was considerably, also after 1800.

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The inventory of Béla Bartók’s original vocal compositions produces a heterogeneous impression: as regards to scoring, form, the derivation of the text, and the attitude of expression, the opera Bluebeard’s Castle, the two collections of songs opp. 15 and 16, Cantata profana for Soli, Choir and Orchestra, and the a cappella series Elmúlt időkből (From Bygone Times) and Twenty-Seven Two- and Three-Part Choruses apparently do not form a homogeneous group. However, they do share the common characteristic of being born as original music out of pre-existing texts. Stylistic features and peculiarities in the choice and the treatment of the texts do reveal some links and parallels between the original vocal works which reflect Bartók’s principles in the setting of texts and in the treatment of voices.

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The recognition of topoi, i.e. traditional formulae, is an important means of musical analysis. To illustrate this, the paper discusses the types of the battaglia and the pastoral in Bach’s Cantata Halt im Gedächtnis Jesum Christ, and briefly enumerates different types of allusions to jazz in 20th-century compositions by Stravinsky, Milhaud, Blacher, Tippet, and Zimmermann. Then it raises the possibility of an analysis of topoi in Bartók’s music in four main categories. It considers Bartók’s musical quotations from Bach to Shostakovich; the chorale as special topos appearing in Mikrokosmos, in the Concerto for Orchestra, in the Adagio religioso of the Third Piano Concerto; the topos-like employment of the tritone; and finally the idea of a Bartókian Arcadia in the Finale of Music for Strings, and the integration of bird song in the Adagio religioso.

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This study demonstrates that Hanns Eisler's serial music composed in the early 1920s and his cantatas created in the 1930s are interrelated with Arnold Schoenberg's serial music. The specific purpose is to reveal the musical interactions between the two composers, such as how Eisler was influenced by Schoenberg, and how Eisler himself influenced Schoenberg. The former aspect is highlighted by the analysis of Schoenberg's Suite für Klavier (1923) and Eisler's Zweite Sonate für Klavier (1925). The latter is shown while Eisler's Deutsche Symphonie from the 1930s and Schoenberg's A Survivor from Warsaw (1947) are subjected to a comparative analysis. Eisler was not simply a pupil who renounced Schoenberg's teachings, but a “true disciple” who succeeded Schoenberg's serial technique in a manner comparable to that of Webern and Berg and who, in addition, was a musical companion of Schoenberg, influencing Schoenberg's later music.

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Summary Partant de la présupposition que la traduction constitue une des formes de la survie des œuvres littéraires et que l'exigence de la rétraduction des œuvres montre la possibilité de la réactualisation de ces œuvres, je vais examiner quelques aspects de l'influence réciproque entre la culture populaire roumaine et hongroise. Les sources textuelles de l'œuvre musicale Cantata profana de Béla Bartók sont des variantes roumaines des ballades populaires roumaines. Ces créations nommées « colindas » (chants de noël) ont survécues grâce à cette composition musicale. L'œuvre du compositeur hongrois a influencée aussi l'idéologie hongroise de la « source pure » : pour la désignation de la pratique qui fait appel et remonte à la culture populaire pour la réintégrer dans des œuvres nouvelles on emploie cette formule de nos jours aussi. On peut montrer qu'un autre ballade « par excellence roumaine », qui a donné la base d'une entière théorie de l'idéologie nationale roumaine et joue un rôle à peu près exclusive, même sacrale dans l'élaboration de l'identité nationale roumaine, la ballade Miorioa présente parenté avec les ballades néo-grécques des cleftis? Ne pourrait-on pas supposer qu'une œvre littéraire distincte de la mémoire collective roumaine provient d'un texte de langue néo-grecque ou bien ukraïnienne ? Ne pourrait-on pas dire que l'on possède une œuvre musicale qui pouvait devenir une des sources de la mémoire, de la connaissance et de l'identité collective hongroise et celle-là en même temps remonte à un texte de langue roumaine ? C'est à ces questions que ma communication cherche les réponses.

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Corpus . In Montanari , Franco - Rengakos , Antonios - Tsagalis , Christos (eds.) Brill S Companion to Hesiod , 131 - 178 . Leiden - Boston : Brill . West , Martin L. 1971 Iambi et elegy Graeci ante Alexandrum cantata . Oxford

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Bartók’s Cantata profana and the related dilemma of choice between freedom and restraints. In sketches of the last movement of the Kafka-Fragmente ( Es blendete uns die Mondnacht… ) Kurtág alludes to the folk song Szerelem, szerelem, játkozott

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the previous eight years. When Veress emigrated, leaving Hungary on 6 February of 1949, Ligeti was a professed leftist and folksong arranger, who would shortly commence upon composing Cantata to a Youth Festival: a piece set to a propaganda text

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, the cantata Meeresstille und glückliche Fahrt , the March with Chorus in E-flat Major op. 114, and Wellingtons Sieg oder Die Schlacht bei Vittoria . 12 Some of the above-listed works were played at the festive concert in the Redoute on December 26

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