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herbal medicine as well as their related products have been evaluated adopting chromatographic fingerprinting which emphasizes the characteristics of overall sample composition [ 8–10 ]. Among the many techniques used to characterize chemical profiles

Open access
Acta Chromatographica
Authors:
Mengya Lu
,
Qianqian Tang
,
Chenyu Zhou
,
Zhizheng Fang
,
Zheng Fan
,
Xiangyu Li
,
Rongchun Han
, and
Xiaohui Tong

chromatographic fingerprinting is playing a very important role in the quality assessment of TCM, and has proven to be scientific and comprehensive [ 7 ]. Lately, the chromatographic fingerprint technology has been introduced as a tool to assess the quality of

Open access

fingerprinting is playing an increasingly important role in the quality control of TCM, and has proven to be practical and scientific [ 9 ]. Recently, the chromatographic fingerprint technique has been introduced as a tool to evaluate the quality of herbal

Open access
Acta Chromatographica
Authors:
M. Daszykowski
,
M. Sajewicz
,
J. Rzepa
,
M. Hajnos
,
D. Staszek
,
Ł. Wojtal
,
T. Kowalska
,
M. Waksmundzka-Hajnos
, and
B. Walczak

Summary

Comparative analysis of twenty different sage (Salvia L.) species grown in Poland has been performed on the basis of two types of chromatographic fingerprints. For efficient preprocessing and comparison of these fingerprints, chemometric methods were used. The main emphasis was on preprocessing of herbal fingerprints and selecting a suitable preprocessing strategy for exploring differences among them. After successful preprocessing of the fingerprints, principal component analysis was used to reveal chemical differences among the samples. An outcome of the comparative analysis was to pinpoint specific regions of the fingerprints indicative of differences among the samples. In fingerprints of the volatile fraction from the sage (Salvia L.) species, obtained from head-space gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, important regions were identified and associated with the presence of camphene, limonene, and eucalyptol in these samples.

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Summary

A liquid chromatographic fingerprinting methodology has been established for identification and quality control of traditional herbal medicines. The methodology was developed from four case studies. Samples of Herba Artemisia annua, Herba Artemisia scoparia, Rhizoma Ligusticum chuanxiong (also called Rhizoma chuanxiong), and Rhizoma Ligusticum jeholense (also called Rhizoma ligustici) were investigated. In each case study, sample preparation and chromatographic conditions (column, organic modifier, column temperature, detection wavelength, and mechanism) were varied to obtain good fingerprints, i.e. with the maximum number of peaks. Further optimization was then performed either by reducing the analysis time or increasing efficiency. The case studies led to the development of a general methodology consisting of sample preparation and HPLC fingerprint development. The fingerprints obtained with the developed methodology were then successfully used to distinguish between the two Artemisia species and between the two Ligusticum species. The methodology also was used to obtain fingerprints for a large number of different Vietnamese Mallotus species, and for Citri reticulatae pericarpium samples collected in different regions of China.

Open access

A two-dimensional thin-layer chromatographic fingerprint has been developed on a polyamide plate for the quality control of Helleborus thibetanus Franch. The investigated sample was separated by chloroform-ethyl acetate-methanol (3.0:8.0:4.4, v/v) in the first dimension and isooctane-n-propyl alcohol-water (10:2.5:1.0, v/v) adding 0.28 mol L−1 sodium dodecyl sulfate, a reversed micelle, in the second dimension. The plate was dried in the air at room temperature and examined in ultraviolet (UV) light at λ = 365 nm after development. The two developments were carried out over a distance of 70 mm. The two-dimensional thin-layer chromatographic method was validated in terms of repeatability, stability, and robustness. For fingerprint analysis, nine spots were identified as common spots. Statistical method (canonical correlation analysis) was first used to calculate the degree of similarity between the two-dimensional chromatograms. The proposed method was novel and accurate for the identification and quality evaluation of H. thibetanus Franch.

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qualitative fingerprints of BYD by UPLC-DAD/ELSD The validation of the qualitative method for chromatographic fingerprints included assessing the stability, precision and repeatability. One sample solution of BYD (S1) was analyzed

Open access

Summary

The potential of high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) fingerprinting in identifying differences in sandalwood essential oils from 5 sandalwood species, namely, Santalum album, Santalum spicatum, Santalum austrocaledonicum, Santalum panic-ulatum, Santalum lanceolatum, and a natural substitute for sandalwood, Osyris lanceolata, was explored. Variation was observed in the profile of bands (R F values and color) and peak intensity profiles displayed by the essential oils across and within the essential oils studied with some bands being unique to the individual species. The potential of HPTLC fingerprinting as a quality control tool in authenticating sandalwood oils in the sandalwood industry was demonstrated in the present study.

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This paper explores the high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) fingerprinting of non-sugar constituents for the authentication of honeys using highly antibacterial Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) and Marri (Corymbia calophylla) honeys sourced from Western Australia, different Leptospermum-derived Manuka honeys, and a typical table honey from an undisclosed floral source as test samples. As is demonstrated in this study, using HPTLC fingerprinting, it is possible to define differences in botanical origin as the honey fingerprints exhibit a unique profile of bands (i.e., R f values, color) and peak profiles (i.e., R f and peak intensity values, peak intensity ratios) that differ distinctly from each other. The identification of patterns of common bands among honeys derived from the same floral source as authentication tool is possible. Further, slight differences among honeys from the same botanical origin might be due to age, processing, or regional factors. The HPTLC analysis of two differently aged Jarrah honeys of the same supplier indicates also that future closer investigation of intraspecies differences might assist in developing HPTLC-supported quality control tools.

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