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Summary  

Major and trace elements were determined in serum of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) using total reflection X-ray fluorescence induced by synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF). CML affects 1 to 2 people per 100,000 and accounts for 7-20% cases of leukemia. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. Using analysis of variance (ANOVA) it was observed that the contents of the P, S, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu and Rb elements differed significantly at a = 0.05 between groups of healthy subjects and CML patients and also genders (males and females).

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Judit Demeter, Anna Poros, Csaba Bödör, Laura Horváth, and Tamás Masszi

References 1 Vardiman, J. W., Melo, J. V., Baccarani, M., et al.: Chronic myelogenous leukaemia, BCR-ABL1 positive. In: Swerdlow, S. H., Campo, E., Harris

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Hungarian Medical Journal
Authors: Miklós Egyed, Balázs Kollár, Péter Rajnics, Éva Karádi, and András Matolcsi

Cortes, J., Talpaz, M., O’Brien, S. et al.: Molecular responses in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase treated with imatinib mesylate. Clin. Cancer Res., 2005, 11 , 3425–3432. O

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Miklós Egyed, Balázs Kollár, Péter Rajnics, Éva Karádi, and András Matolcsi

Cortes, J., Talpaz, M., O’Brien, S. és mtsai: Molecular responses in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in chronic phase treated with imatinib mesylate. Clin. Cancer Res., 2005, 11 , 3425–3432. O

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Aliz-Beáta Tunyogi, Erzsébet Lázár, István Benedek jr., Johanna Sándor-Kéri, Annamária Zsigmond, and István Benedek

Transl Med. 2018; 7: 305–314. 2 Copland M. Chronic myelogenous leukemia stem cells: what’s new? Curr Hematol Malig Rep. 2009; 4: 66–73. 3 Zhou F, Jin R, Hu Y

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After a short explanatory Introduction, an immunotherapy protocol is presented for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM is considered to be an incurable tumor; tumor-free survival over 2 to 3 years is so rare that when it happens the original diagnosis is questioned. It is known that the type of the genetic mutation that a given GBM tumor harbors strongly influences the length of survival. However, most patients with GBM are receiving treatment without the preparation of a microarray gene map of their tumors. It is possible that the reason for a rare and exceptional long survival was not the treatment that the patient received, but the type of gene mutations that the tumor was exposed to. It is recognized that any therapeutic approach should ideally be evaluated against the background of all prognostic factors of each individual case, prominent among them the microarray gene map of the tumor. In practice, this is not easily achieved, while the patient is in need of, and is expecting, prompt therapy. Insurance companies do not reimburse the patient, or the clinical investigators, or their institutions for investigational diagnostic tests, or such treatment modalities. A temporary compromise is possible. The emergence of empirically administered treatment modalities with extraordinary efficacy has occasionally been recorded in the history of medical oncology. In some of these rare clinical trials, the control groups were discontinued (to the dismay of the statisticians), and the control patients were enrolled in the treatment groups so to escape doom and share the benefit of the unfolding high remission inductions experienced in the treatment group. Chemo-radiotherapy of Hodgkin's disease and cisplatin therapy of certain testicular carcinomas provided the first éclat examples. More recently, the rapidly approved and marketed imitanib mesylate for Ph-chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia and the anti-HER2/neu monoclonal antibody trastuzumab, and the not yet marketed double tyrosine kinase (ErbB1/2) inhibitor lapatinib (Tykerb, GlaxoSmithKline) for a subgroup of breast carcinoma patients excelled. Thus, a clinical trial for GBM, but without precise pre-identification of all its prognostic factors, however with a great deal of evidence-based empirical expectations of benefits, for patients with rapid advancement toward a fatal outcome, implying an element of urgency, appears to be justified.

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Gyöngyi Kirschner, Bernadett Balla, János Kósa, Péter Horváth, Andrea Kövesdi, Gergely Lakatos, István Takács, Zsolt Nagy, Bálint Tóbiás, Kristóf Árvai, and Péter Lakatos

References 1 Cohen, M. H., Moses, M. L., Pazdur, R.: Gleevec™ for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

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Összefoglaló. A mély molekuláris remisszióban lévő CML-es betegnél láz, izomfájdalmak alakultak ki, melyet jelentős kétvonalas cytopenia kísért. Alapbetegségének blasztos transzfomációja mellett, az utazási anamnézisre tekintettel a differenciáldiagnosztika trópusi betegségekre is kiterjedt. Dengue-lázat diagnosztizáltunk, melyből a beteg szövődmény nélkül felépült.

Summary. A CML patient in deep molecular remission was admitted with fever, muscle pain, followed by pronounced bilineage cytopenia. In addition to possible blastic transformation, tropical diseases were also included in the differential diagnosis, due to travel history. Dengue fever was diagnosed, and the patient recovered without any complications.

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. Prognostic significance of the morphological dysplastic changes in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Leuk Res. 1986; 10: 331–337. 21 Kiss A, Oláh É, Iványi JL, et al. Megakaryoblastic

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. Samet , I. , Han , J. , Jlaiel , L. , Sayadi , S. & Isoda , H. ( 2014 ): Olive ( Olea europaea ) leaf extract induces apoptosis and monocyte/macrophage differentiation in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells: Insight

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