Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 92 items for :

  • "compulsive Internet use" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

who experience compulsive Internet use (CIU), that is, those who struggle to integrate the Internet adaptively in their lives, to the point of experiencing conflict and loss of control over its use ( Griffiths, Shonin, & Van Gordon, 2016 ). Although

Open access

& Garretsen, 2010 ; Sim, Gentile, Bricolo, Serpelloni & Gulamoydeen, 2012 ). Nowadays, there seems to be agreement in the key elements summarized by Meerkerk et al. in their definition of Compulsive Internet Use (CIU) as the “pattern of Internet use

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Farah Ben Brahim
,
Stephane Rothen
,
Francesco Bianchi-Demicheli
,
Robert Courtois
, and
Yasser Khazaal

part of the questionnaire included questions that explored the participants’ sociodemographic characteristics. The remainder of the questionnaire included three tools: (a) the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS), (b) the Cybersex Motives Questionnaire

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Katajun Lindenberg
,
Carolin Szász-Janocha
,
Sophie Schoenmaekers
,
Ulrich Wehrmann
, and
Eva Vonderlin

different aspects of IUD. Specifically, Compulsive Internet Use, Online Addiction Behavior , and Problems Caused by Computer Use were measured using three questionnaires. In addition, Time Spent Online was recorded. Overall, the diagnostic instruments

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Karina Bernstein
,
Michael Patrick Schaub
,
Harald Baumeister
,
Matthias Berking
,
David Daniel Ebert
, and
Anna-Carlotta Zarski

: Symptoms of IUDs were also assessed by the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS; 14 items, score range: 0–56; α = 0.89) ( Meerkerk, 2007 ; Meerkerk, Van Den Eijnden, Vermulst, & Garretsen, 2008 ). Higher items represent higher IUD symptoms. In contrast to

Open access

likely to have less than 10 years of school education. Differences in gender, age, status, and CIUS scores could not be observed ( Zadra et al., 2016 ). Measures The Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS

Open access
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Hannah Schmidt
,
Dominique Brandt
,
Anja Bischof
,
Silja Heidbrink
,
Gallus Bischof
,
Stefan Borgwardt
, and
Hans-Jürgen Rumpf

.g., gaming or social networks). The Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS), the 10 Item-Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGDT-10), and the Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale (BSMAS) are examples of such screening instruments that are widely used for research

Open access

Abstract

Background and Aims

Internet Gaming Disorder, a subtype of Internet Addiction, is now classified in Section 3 of the DSM-5. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been suggested in treating Internet addiction as this modality has been shown to be an effective treatment for similar impulse control disorders. Given the daily and necessary use of the Internet and technology in general compared to other compulsive syndromes, a specialized form of CBT has been developed called Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Internet Addiction (CBT-IA). CBT-IA is a comprehensive three phase approach that includes behavior modification to control compulsive Internet use, cognitive restructuring to identify, challenge, and modify cognitive distortions that lead to addictive use, and harm reduction techniques to address and treat co-morbid issues associated with the disorder.

Methods

As the first model of its kind, this study examines 128 clients to measure treatment outcomes using CBT-IA. Clients were evaluated using the Internet Addiction Test (IAT) to classify subjects and were administered twelve weekly sessions of CBT-IA. Treatment outcomes were measured at the end of the twelve weeks, one-month, three months and at six month post-treatment.

Results

Results showed that over 95% of clients were able to manage symptoms at the end of the twelve weeks and 78% sustained recovery six months following treatment.

Discussion and Conclusions

Results found that CBT-IA was effective at ameliorating symptoms associated with Internet addiction after twelve weekly sessions and consistently over one-month, three months, and six months after therapy. Further research implications such as investigating long-term outcome effects of the model with larger client populations and treatment differences among the subtypes of Internet addiction or with other cultural populations using CBT-IA are discussed.

Open access

R. C. M. E. Engels 2008 Online communication, compulsive Internet use, and psychosocial well-being among adolescents: A longitudinal study Developmental Psychology

Open access

A. A. Vermulst H. F. L. Garretsen 2009 The Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS): Some psychometric properties

Open access