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.) (2000): Natural Conflict Resolution . University of California Press: Berkeley CA. Natural Conflict Resolution 2000

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. In M. Deutsch, P. T. Coleman, & E. C. Marcus (Eds.), The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice (pp. 69–91). (2nd ed.) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Kaland, N., Callesen, K., Moller-Nielsen, A., Mortensen, E. L

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Atamturk A, Savelsbergh M. W. P. Conflict graphs in solving integer programming problems, European Journal of Operational Research Vol. 121, 2000, pp. 40

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. The Evolution of Cooperation Bhavnani, R. and Backer, D. (2000): Localized Ethnic Conflict and Genocide. Accounting for Differences in Rwanda and Burundi. Journal of Conflict

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Personal Business Transaction. Journal of Conflict Resolution , 38 (4): 647-664. The Effect of Friendship on Personal Business Transaction. Journal of Conflict Resolution

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Press. [2] Hajnal , A. , Juhász , I. , Soukup , L. , Szentmiklóssy , Z. 2011 Conflict free colorings of (strongly) almost disjoint set-systems Acta Math. Hungar. 131 230 – 274 10

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Authors: András Hajnal, István Juhász, Lajos Soukup and Zoltán Szentmiklóssy

References [1] Cheilaris , P. , Conflict-Free Coloring , PhD thesis, City University of New York ( 2008 ). [2

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Authors: Norbert Meskó, András Láng, Réka Ferenczhalmy, Krisztina Miklós and Barbara Glöckner

Chafetz, J.S. (1978). Masculine/feminine or human? An overview of the sociology of sex roles . Itasca: F. E. Peacock Cingöz-Ulu, B. & Lalonde, R.N. (2007). The role of culture and relational context in interpersonal conflict: Do

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20 475 487 Takæcs, K. (2001): Structural Embeddedness and Intergroup Conflict. Journal of Conflict Resolution , 45 : 743

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Abstract

In the first part of this study, I will take into consideration the possible relationships between the anthropologist and the subjects being researched with regards to the terms informant, friendship and cooperation, focusing on the possible connections between them and their impacts. It seems obvious that the relationship between the anthropologist and locals can only function if mutual trust develops in an atmosphere that enables research subjects to reveal themselves and the researcher to collect information effectively. It would seem that the prerequisite for this on the part of the researcher is friendliness, but this gives rise to the question of whether friendliness and positive relations are the only elements necessary for the research to be successful. In other words, is it possible to imagine that fieldwork can sometimes benefit from a lack of friendly behaviour? Is it plausible that occasional conflict between the anthropologist and locals or local individuals may facilitate effective research and assimilation? Using an event from my own fieldwork, I will attempt to show how conflict in a given situation can be decidedly constructive to the researcher and how in certain cases unplanned and spontaneous contact that crosses the line of self-censorship toward deliberate confrontation can be significant with regards to the success of the research.

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