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contribution the label ‘onset’ refers to a prevocalic consonant or to a prevocalic consonant cluster that phonologically behaves as a single consonant, sitting in the same syllabic constituent and subject to co-occurrence restrictions. A cluster, on the other

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beszédben 2006 Olaszy, Gábor. 2007. Mássalhangzó-kapcsolódások a magyar beszédben [Consonant clusters in Hungarian]. Budapest

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Emergent phonological constraints

The acquisition of *COMPLEX in English

Acta Linguistica Academica
Author: Jeroen van de Weijer

Emergent Phonology seeks to minimize the role of Universal Grammar in linguistics by investigating how units such as distinctive features, segments, words, morphemes, and syllables, and other aspects of grammar, such as phonological, morphological or syntactic rules and conditions, emerge in the course of acquisition and language use, rather than as part of an innate language capacity. An obvious candidate for being acquired rather than being innate are the phonological constraints that take a central place in Optimality Theory. In this paper I discuss whether, and if so how, a constraint like *COMPLEX ‘No complex onsets’, which is assumed to be active in the acquisition of English and many other languages, could be acquired on the basis of the data to which the English language-learning child is exposed. If this constraint is acquired, it lessens the burden on any innate capacity, which is hypothesized to contain more general, cognitive strategies—perhaps not exclusive to linguistics.

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In Balearic Catalan, first person singular present indicative verb forms do not show an explicit inflectional morph, as do most dialects of Catalan. Among these forms, we find final consonant clusters that involve a violation of the sonority constraint according to which the degree of sonority between the segments of a syllable must be decreasing in relation to the nucleus. The same clusters in nominal inflection are resolved by means of a process of vowel epenthesis. The exceptional phonological behavior of these consonant clusters is not circumscribed to sonority factors, but also concerns the regular phonology of the dialect, either because a general process fails to apply, or because a process applies though the conditions that make it applicable are not visible. Previous approaches have analyzed these final consonant clusters, not as codas, but as onsets of empty nuclei: this exceptional syllabic status would, according to these proposals, throw some light on this peculiar phonological behavior. In this paper we investigate the theoretical problems deriving from approaches of this kind and demonstrate that they are better analyzed by considering paradigmatic effects, such as uniformity and contrast between the members of a morphological paradigm. Furthermore, we critically review the different theories developed in Optimality Theory in order to account for surface resemblances and dissimilarities between the members of a paradigm and introduce a detailed formalization of Paradigmatic Contrast .

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Abstract

The present paper gives a positive answer to the question about the possibility of adequate poetic translation. It presents extracts of Russian poetry that contain various phonic devices (e.g. rhythmic variations, sound repetitions, vowel alternations, consonant clusters, etc.) which, in addition to other verbal means, make up the peculiar aesthetic value of a poetic work. The Hungarian translations of the extracts from Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman and Eugene Onegin, Tyutchev’s Autumn Evening, and Tvardovsky’s Vassili Tyorkin, made by the prominent poets and translators Lajos Áprily, Árpád Galgóczy, and Lőrinc Szabó, masterly reproduce the phonic qualities of the Russian texts, and prove the validity of the Pushkinian claim on the “alliance of sound, thought, and sentiment” in lyric poetry.

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. Consonant cluster phonotactics: A perceptual approach. Doctoral dissertation. MIT. Côté M-Hélène Consonant cluster phonotactics: A perceptual approach

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Recasens, Daniel — Maria Dolores Pallarès 2001. Coarticulation, assimilation and blending in catalan consonant clusters. In: Journal of Phonetics 29: 273–301. Pallarès M. D

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Phonetics 1990 18 299 320 Byrd, Dani 1992. Perception of assimilation in consonant clusters: A

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Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors: Katalin Balogné Bérces and Shanti Ulfsbjorninn

/lax vowel distinction (Pochtrager). Consonant clusters have traditionally played a pivotal role in representational phonology – our input on this front lies in the papers by Živanović and Passino. Another traditional key concern has been segmental strength

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similar behaviour of l, r, j in some consonant clusters of Hungarian]. In: Magyar Nyelv 73: 20-30. Az l, r, j hangok azonos magatartásformái a magyar nyelv bizonyos kételemű magánhangzó-kapcsolódásaiban [The similar behaviour

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