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In our publication, more than one basic toothed gear pairs have been designed and modelled. Normal tension dispersions – appearing in the contact zone of the drive pair – and their measure on contact tooth surfaces have been analyzed by the effect of a given moment load. During designing the numbers of the teeth of the gear pairs have been chosen equal, but the modules of the pairs have been different. We analyze how normal tension values form on the tooth surfaces of the gears in the contact zone of the tooth and on their root zone as a function of the change of the module in the case of the same meshing method, loads and boundary conditions.

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This paper explores the portraits of a number of Tarsia family members who served as dragomans to the Venetian Republic in the late 17th century. The portraits are currently kept in the Koper Museum in Slovenia. In this study I consider dragomans as cultural intermediaries; just like commercial brokers and religious converts, dragomans historically occupied the contact zones where different cultures met and clashed. Dragomans can be considered “trans-imperial” subjects because they straddled political, linguistic and cultural boundaries between empires, in this case the Ottoman Empire and Venice. This professional group also pioneered the introduction of new customs and manners in the field of culture and arts. This study explores dragomans as clients and patrons of artists, an aspect with emerged as a part and parcel of their role as influential cultural intermediaries in the early modern Mediterranean. Portraits of Tarsia family members are among the earliest known to have been commissioned by dragomans. The patronage extended by such families of dragomans as the Tarsias demonstrates their social standing. These portraits exemplify the active role of dragomans as powerful cultural agents and serve as documentary evidence of the manners, dress codes, and professional symbols of dragomans.

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Abstract

Ethnographic shows existed as peculiar projects in a specific time and space. Correspondingly, entertainment played a specific role in the life of modernizing cities. This article aims at reconstructing the circumstances and places of entertainment in Gdańsk, where representatives of ‘exotic’ peoples from distant continents performed on stage. The stage was not only that of ethnic shows (Völkerschauen), where the program of the performance was entirely devoted to one group, but also circuses, where ‘exotic others’ performed alongside other artists, as well as theaters with a light repertoire of variétés that were operating in Gdańsk at the time. The specificity of shows performed by people from distant lands seemed to reside in emphasizing differences: cultural, ethnic and civilizational. Questions emerge concerning what these shows were like, how ‘wildness’ was perceived and how ‘exotic’ daily life was presented? The presented materials have been gathered from the accounts and press advertisements of the Gdańsk press at the time. If meaning in shows was embodied in form, technique, and place, the question at hand, is what precisely we can ascertain about entertainment institutions in urban landscape from this kind of data.

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A Kaukázus –nemkülönben Közép-Ázsia –orosz fennhatóság alóli függetlenedése több szem-pontból a konfliktusok újjáéledését jelenti, egyrészt Törökország, Irán, Oroszország és az „új államalakulatok”, illetve maguk az új államalakulatok egymásközti viszonyában, másrészt az adott „politikai egysége_Ä

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) Csámer , Á. , M. Kozák 2009 : Magma/nedves üledék kölcsönhatás fáciesjelenségei késo-miocén andezitbenyomulások kontaktusán Tardona ÉK-i eloterében (Lithofacies of magma and wet sediment interaction in the contact zone of Late Miocene

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Authors: János Haas, Tamás Budai, István Dunkl, Éva Farics, Sándor Józsa, Szilvia Kövér, Annette E. Götz, Olga Piros and Péter Szeitz

, Fossils: p – palynomorphs, a – algae, f – Foraminifera. Legend: (1) dolomite of platform facies; (2) dolomite of basin facies; (3) andesite; (4) tectonic breccia; (5) contact zone; and (6) lamination As already

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Based on many sources, the paper makes an attempt to identify the social effects produced by the rising use of coffee and tobacco in the Balkans, and to mark out similarities and differences with respect to associated developments in other parts of the Ottoman Empire and in the European countries. The Balkans was a very interesting contact zone where influences of two civilisations intermingled and where all developments were largely dependent on the attitude of the majority population, the non-Muslim Ottoman subjects.

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Modes of contact among languages and cultures of smaller dissemination are worthy of study not only because they reveal the hegemonic weight of intermediary languages and cultures but also because they show how these cultures may choose to remain indifferent to each other for historical and political reasons. Slovene and Turkish are two prime examples which have had virtually no direct literary and cultural contacts. The papers included in this special issue illustrate the forms and nature of mediated contacts between these two cultures and explore the role translation and translators have had in creating reciprocal images of the two cultures. They also shed new light on concepts such as transfer, non-translation, metonymics of translation and contact zones.

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At the end of the prosperity of the coal mining industry in Upper Silesia in Poland, new habitats were created in disturbed areas which, in the case of flooded mine subsidence, led to the formation of a type of ecological niche not encountered before. In the present work the authors describe the diversity of oak-hornbeam forest in the areas of flooded mine subsidence and the thrips communities connected with them. In 2006 and 2007, the thrips fauna of subsidence areas was sampled in biotopes directly associated with depressions (waterside, contact zones between aquatic and terrestrial — forest biotopes). In both ecosystems a total of 118 plant species and 56 thrips species were found. Disturbance of land resulting in flooded mine subsidence contributes to increased species diversity of both plants and thrips. Other kinds of disturbance such as traffic routes and its direct and indirect impact cause reduce numbers of plants and thrips species.

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Abstract  

In studying contact phenomena between different types of rocks, it is important to analyze (small) samples from the contact zone for a combination of major and trace elements. This has been done in a recent study of the metamorphosis of quartzite into granite in eastern Sweden.1 Important major elements are Na, Al, K, Fe and Mn, but the trace elements Cr, Co, Rb and Cs have also been determined. Another investigation to which this principle has been applied concerns the mutual relation of a group of ultrabasic rocks in central Greece. The most important elements here are Na, Al, K, Sc and Cr.2 Four routine determinations which are used in this type of studies are presented here.

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