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Semantics 1992 1 75 116 Selkirk, Elisabeth O. 2008. Contrastive focus, givenness and the unmarked

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. The handbook of phonological theory 1995 Selkirk, Elisabeth O. 2002. Contrastive FOCUS vs. presentational focus: Prosodic

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Three dimensions can be distinguished in a cross-linguistic account of information structure. First, there is the definition of the focus constituent, the part of the linguistic expression which is subject to some focus meaning. Second and third, there are the focus meanings and the array of structural devices that encode them. In a given language, the expression of focus is facilitated as well as constrained by the grammar within which the focus devices operate. The prevalence of focus ambiguity, the structural inability to make focus distinctions, will thus vary across languages, and within a language, across focus meanings.

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In this paper we discuss Slovenian ditransitive sentences with respect to the two possible word orders of the objects found with neutral intonation, DAT≫ACC and ACC≫DAT. We follow the idea in the Gračanin-Yuksek (2006) paper on Croatian that these two word orders instantiate different structures. In Slovenian, the DAT≫ACC order has an applicative structure (either high or low), while the ACC≫DAT is a prepositional dative construction. The applicative analysis provides a novel argument for this type of analysis. Other supporting arguments examined are scope properties, binding of possessives, the possibility of the causative reading, non-contrastive focus and heavy NP shift, and properties of idioms.

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Most analyses of Bartók’s Contrasts focus on abstract compositional ideas such as musical language, form, and motivic unity. Manuscript sources, however, show that practical considerations played an equally important role in the compositional process. Bartók adventurously exploited the potentials of the instruments (clarinet, violin and piano) as well as that of the musicians (Benny Goodman and Joseph Szigeti) for whom he composed the piece, but, within certain boundaries, he was also ready to make concessions to them. Since Bartók was commissioned to write Contrasts, the composition had to fill a number of essentially practical requirements. When he began composing, he had to regard as given some of the basic characteristics of the work such as the instrumentation, the need to include virtuoso cadenzas for both soloists, number, tempi, and approximate duration of movements, as well as some stylistic features. Even so, the composer did not adhere strictly to all of the requirements. The compositional process of Contrasts, therefore, can be interpreted as a simultaneous realization of both practical and abstract ideas.

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. The handbook of phonological theory 1995 Selkirk, Elisabeth O. 2002. Contrastive FOCUS vs. presentational focus: Prosodic

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Acta Linguistica Hungarica
Authors:
Caroline Féry
,
Gisbert Fanselow
, and
Manfred Krifka

Language Semantics 1999 7 141 177 Selkirk, Elisabeth O. 2002. Contrastive FOCUS vs

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Linguistic exhaustivity inference is context dependent

A visual-world eye-tracking study on Hungarian focus

Acta Linguistica Academica
Authors:
Tamás Káldi
and
Anna Babarczy

. Dotrecht: Foris. 183–195. Levinson , Stephen C. 2000 . Presumptive meanings: The theory of generalized conversational implicature . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Mády , Katalin. 2015 . Prosodic (non-)realisation of broad, narrow and contrastive

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and contrastive focus in the German middlefield. In: Inga Kohlhof — Susanne Winkler — Hana Bernhard Drubig (eds): Göttingen Focus Workshop. Arbeitspapiere des SFB 340, Bericht Nr. 69, 137–157. University of Tübingen, Tübingen

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263 93 102 Li, Ke-Ning. 2008. Contrastive focus structure in Mandarin. In M. K. M. Chan and H. Kang (eds.) Proceedings of the 20th Northern American

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