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Daily body core temperature rhythm has been known to become blunted for several days following intra-abdominal implantation of biotelemetry transmitters in small rodents and about a week is required for re-establishment of stable body core temperature oscillation. In the present study carried out on mice it was found that a repetition of the same minor surgical intervention (laparotomy) several days apart could speed up the stabilization of body temperature oscillations. Melatonin supplied with the drinking water continuously was found to speed up the return of stable daily body temperature rhythm further on consecutive laparotomies, while daily injections of methylprednisolone resulted in some delay in the development of stable body core temperature oscillations. It is concluded that in C57BL/6 mice possessing low plasma levels of melatonin exhibit an adaptive response to repeated stresses influencing the dynamics of daily body temperature rhythm.

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warmiing on body heat content and core temperature. Anesthesiology, 2004, 100 , 1058–1064. Kabon B. Effects of circulating water garment and forced air warmiing on body heat content

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Summary  

The measurement of the dose-rate on the top-surface of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) has been used to monitor the in-core reactor power and estimate the average core temperature. An experimental correlation for the prediction of both reactor power level and average core-coolant temperature as functions of dose-rate measurement have been obtained. An alternative method for both neutron flux monitoring and average core temperature using dose-rate measurement has been suggested. Comparing the results with the calibrated reactor power, reasonable agreement between predicted and real data measurement has been found. Despite of this agreement, the measurement of dose-rate on top of the MNSR surface as an additional mean for the prediction of in-core power or average core temperature should be considered carefully.

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Szelényi Z, Székely M, Czippán L: Autonomic cold- and heat-defence of rats during a febrile rise in core temperature induced by intracerebroventricular infusion of prostaglandin E 1 . Pathophysiology 3, 219-226 (1996) Autonomic

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of luteal phase elevation in core temperature on forearm blood flow during exercise . J. Appl. Physiol . 82 ( 4 ), 1079 – 1083 ( 1997 ) 7. Marsh SA , Jenkins DG : Physiological responses to the menstrual cycle: implications for the

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Abstract  

Shrimp continues to be the most important commodity traded in value terms, accounting for 16.5% of the total value of internationally traded fishery products in 2004. Despite this importance of shrimp, literature is almost lacking on reports dealing with changes in functional properties and quality caused by heating shrimps while influence of freezing has been investigated more in depth. Therefore, objective of the study was cooking shrimp to different core temperatures in the range 30–80°C and monitoring changes in quality by measuring colour and texture attributes. DSC curves taken on differently heated shrimp differed markedly. With increasing temperature the enthalpy of denaturation decreased significantly.

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Abstract  

The differences in bound water content of beef semimembranous muscle samples obtained from previously chilled (24 h at +4°C) middle-aged beef carcasses were determined by the use of DSC. Initially, samples obtained from fresh, unprocessed meat were frozen at −40, −50 or −65°C to determine their melting peaks for freezable water (free water) content with the use of DSC. The samples were then subjected to an environment with an ambient temperature of −30, −35, −40 or −45°C, with no air circulation, or with an air circulation speed of 2 m s−1, until a thermal core temperature of −18°C was attained; this was followed by thawing the samples until a thermal core temperature of 0°C was reached. This process was followed by subjecting the samples to the ambient temperatures mentioned above, to accomplish complete freezing and thawing of the samples, with DSC, and thereby determination of the freezable water contents, which were then used to determine the peaks of melting. The calculated peak areas were divided by the latent heat of melting for pure water, to determine the freezable water contents of the samples. The percentage freezable water content of each sample was determined by dividing its freezable water content by its total water content; and the bound water content of each sample was determined by subtracting the percentage free water content from the total. In view of the fact that the free water content of a sample is completely in the frozen phase at temperatures of −40°C and below, the calculations of free and bound water contents of the samples were based on the averages of values obtained at three different temperatures.

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WBC, CK, and LDH and the circadian rhythm of core temperature in soccer players ( 16 ). From the evidence of similarity in the time of peak between temperature, muscle damage, and MDA levels ( 20 ), Kanabrocki et al. ( 22 ) demonstrated a correlation

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9 16 Raible LH, Knickerbocker D: α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and [Nle4,D-Phe7]-α-MSH: effects on core temperature in rats. Physiol. Biochem. Behav. 44, 533

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, Kaszaki J , Halberg F . Validation of exclusive daytime murine sampling on antiphasic lighting regimens by circadian rhytmic core temperature behavior. Proceedings of Symposium on Chronobiology in Medicine, Brno . pp. 100 – 101 ( 2004 ) 29

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