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30 November 2009 on cosmetic products (recast) , Official Journal of European Union L342 , 2009 , p. 59 [10] M.V. Heisterberg , T. Menné

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Introduction Hexachlorophene (HCP) is an antimicrobial agent, which was probably used in soaps, liquid detergents, cosmetics, and plant fungicides and pesticides [ 1 ]. However, when HCP is absorbed too much, it can lead to

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Introduction Hexachlorophene (HCP) is an antimicrobial agent, which was probably used in soaps, liquid detergents, cosmetics, and plant fungicides and pesticides [ 1 ]. However, when HCP is absorbed too much, it can lead to nervous system

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Introduction Halogenated phenols have strong bactericidal action against gram-positive bacteria. They are generally used as preservative in toothpaste, cream, and lotion cosmetics, and the most commonly used are chlorophenols (CPs) [ 1 ]. Cosmetics

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food, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and so on. The esters of p -hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) have become the most frequently used preservatives, due to their strong stability, low volatility, and low irritability [ 4 ]. Iodopropynyl butylcarbamate used

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. Wang Q. Ma 2008 Int. J. Cosmetic Sci. 30 367 . [24

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. 14 478 . [7]. Hygienic Standard for Cosmetics , Military Medical Science Press, Beijing, P. R. China, 2007, pp. 4 , 61, 241 – 242

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Abstract  

In Japan, cosmetics claiming hormesis effect are available through Internet. Although these cosmetics show the contents, they never mention the minor elements and radioactive sources. The existence of radioisotopes, however, was observed by measurements of the gamma-rays with a HPGe detector. In this study, in order to clarify the contents of trace elements, the hormesis cosmetics including radioactive sources were analyzed using INAA, PGAA and NAA with multiple gamma-ray detection (NAAMG). Nineteen elements were analyzed quantitatively in hormesis cosmetics by INAA, PGAA and NAAMG and 16 elements were detected qualitatively by SEM-EPMA.

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Recently, a growing interest has been observed in preventive and “anti-ageing” medicine, accompanied by a dynamic growth of the cosmetic industry worldwide. Different companies compete in introducing the best performing antioxidants to cosmetic preparations and to diet supplements, and in the course of recent years, great attention has been drawn by trans-resveratrol. For economic reasons, the main sources of trans-resveratrol for the cosmetic industry are plants and plant extracts, and the most popular plant is common grape vine (Vitis vinifera L.). The novelty of this study was the development of a simple thin-layer chromatographic method in the reversed-phase (RP) mode with densitometric detection in the fluorescence mode (the irradiation wavelength λ = 340 nm), enabling quantification of trans-resveratrol in selected cosmetic raw materials of natural origin. Cosmetic raw materials considered were red, white, and fruit wines (employed in “wine spas”), commercial extracts of red wines and other fruits, and commercial extracts of grape skins and seeds, making twenty different samples altogether. Prior to thin-layer chromatographic analysis, trans-resveratrol was isolated from the investigated raw materials by means of solid-phase extraction (SPE). The polyphenols fraction adsorbed on SPE cartridges was eluted, and the eluates containing trans-resveratrol (along with other stilbene derivatives) were developed by means of TLC. The chromatograms were densitometrically scanned and trans-resveratrol extracted from raw materials was quantified, based on the calibration curve obtained for the trans-resveratrol standard. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values of the developed method were determined as equal to 1.88 and 5.69 ng, respectively. The presence of trans-resveratrol in the analyzed samples was additionally confirmed by visualizing the chromatograms with anisaldehyde as a selective visualizing reagent.

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Abstract  

Some trace elements exist in cosmetics due to the mineral origin of their raw materials and there is no information about their concentration levels in these products. Other trace elements must not be contained in cosmetics according to the list of European Communities. Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been applied to determine the elements: cerium, cesium, europium, hafnium, lanthanum, lutetium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, sodium, tantalum, terbium, tungsten and ytterbium in eyeshadow, face powder and rouge make up cosmetic products from the Greek market. According to our results, a wide range of values was found between the three examined cosmetics as well as between the different samples belong to the same kind of cosmetics. This probably could be attributed to the various manufacturers of the analyzed samples. Moreover the use of neutron activation analysis as a suitable routine method is discussed for the control of some elements which must not be contained in cosmetics.

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