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Aleinikov, A. G. (2002): Novology, the Science of Newness, for Creativity and Innovation Research. In: Aleinikov, A. (ed.): The Future of Creativity . Bensenville, IL: Scholastic Testing Services, Inc., pp. 113

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Bogen , J. E., Bogen , G. M. (1969) The corpus callosum and creativity. Bulletin of the Los Angeles Neurological Society, 34, 191–220. Cai , D. J., Mednick , S. A., Harrison , E. M., Kanady , J

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), 71–91. Barron, F. (1968). Creativity and Personal Freedom . Princeton, New Jersey: D. Van Nostrand Company Inc. Carver, C. S., Scheier, M. F., & Segerstrom, S. C. (2010). Optimism. Clinical

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References Agars , M. D. – Kaufman , J. C. – Locke , T. R. ( 2008 ): Social Influence and Creativity in Organizations: a Multilevel Lens for Theory, Research, and

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Creativity may be a trait, a state or just a process defined by its products. It can be contrasted with certain cognitive activities that are not ordinarily creative, such as problem-solving, deduction, induction, learning, imitation, trial-and-error, heuristics and “abduction”, however, all of these can be done creatively too. There are four kinds of theories, attributing creativity respectively to (1) method, (2) “memory”(innate structure), (3) magic or (4) mutation. These theories variously emphasize the role of an unconscious mind, innate constraints, analogy, aesthetics, anomalies, formal constraints, serendipity, mental analogs, heuristic strategies, improvisatory performance and cumulative collaboration. There is some virtue in each, but the best model is still the one implicit in Pasteur's dictum: “Chance favors the prepared mind.”And because the exercise and even the definition of creativity requires constraints, it is unlikely that “creativity training”or an emphasis on freedom in education can play a productive role in this preparation.

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Andreasen , N. C. (1987) Creativity and mental illness: Prevalence rates in writers and first-degree relatives. American Journal of Psychiatry, 144, 1288–1292. Asari , T., Konishi , S., Jimura , K

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Gegesi K. P., Lénárd F., Molnár I. (szerk.) Pszichológiai Tanulmányok, I. kötet . 5. Akadémiai Kiadó, Budapest Getzels , J. W., Jackson , P. W. (1962) Creativity and intelligence . J. Wiley

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Pszichológia
Authors: Zoltán Kőváry, Ágnes Devecsery, Krisztina Jakab, Barbara Pusztai, Laura Agócs, Réka Kómár, and Gábor Orosz

Averill, J. (1999): Individual differences in emotional creativity: structure and correlates. Journal of Personality , 67(2) , 332–371. Averill J

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, artistic and economic domains largely depends on the creative élan of knowledge communities to attract new talents and to innovate. The centrality of creativity as the engine of social and scientific progress is witnessed by the plethora of research

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Comparing with the population, many Hungarians achieved outstanding success in natural sciences in the 20th century. From this fact, the conclusion can be drawn that Hungarians are very creative. In analyzing this conclusion, a simple general model of creativity is used which distinguishes between the approaches of the genious theory and Zeitgeist theory. By applying the Zeitgeist theory, the paper concludes that some elements of the Hungarian culture significantly contributed to the success of the Hungarian scientists, although all of them left Hungary at a certain point of their career. Migration was a key element of their success because they could find relevant problems and meritocratic scientific community in the scientific centers.

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