Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for :

  • "critical edition" x
Clear All

This paper contains a critical edition of an unpublished Sanskrit play preserved in an incomplete Nepalese manuscript dated to 1382. In the introduction an attempt is made to determine when and where the play might have been written, and on what possible sources the plot is based.

Restricted access

Abstract

This paper presents a critical edition of Mordecai Qazaz's poem Adam oglu 'Man's son' written in Crimean Karaim probably at the end of the 18th century. It was published in 1841 under another title by Jacob Firkovich who did not provide the name of its author. This publication has not yet been examined. It is only now that we can identify it with Adam oglu. In the present edition, the text is edited on the basis of four manuscripts and the printed edition. Attempt was made to established the basic form of the poem and discuss language features.

Restricted access

The concept of the historisch-kritische Gesamtausgabe series of the 1950s (the New Bach, Mozart, Haydn, etc., editions) is rightly questioned today. Not least because for the sake of making an impeccable text of a scholarly edition a certain kind of selfdefensive attitude of editors had priority over the interest of the intelligent user: the text should be eternally valid, the editor would not take the responsibility to answer justifiable questions of the performer. In case of 20th-century composers the source chain of a work from sketches to the printed and revised version(s) is not only much better documented than in the music of Baroque and Classical masters, but some composers (Schoenberg, etc.) explained their special use of performance instructions. In this respect Bartók is an intriguing and well-studied case, however, performers are often mislead by contradictory information or supposed authentic traditions. The forthcoming complete critical edition will offer two texts in each volume — not within the Critical Commentaries but before the score On Bartók’s Notation (partly standard, partly genre-oriented basic information), and Editorial Notes for the Performer (on each composition in the volume).

Restricted access

The critical edition of Hyperides’ speech against Diondas.

Restricted access

The Xth volume of the Collection of Hungarian Folk Music — Corpus Musicae Popularis Hungaricae (CMPH) came out in 1997. Its title page (Facsimilel), similary to the previous volumes, contains the remark: „Established by Béla Bartók and Zoltán Kodály.” As the editor of the Xth volume, I feel it is high time to face the question: do we still have the right to refer to the founders, as Bartók died well before the apperance of the first volume, and Kodály died after the Vth?

Restricted access

The string quartets of Bartók, each written in a considerably different style, as a six-piece series became from the 1950s on an almost unrivaled standard of the 20th-century repertoire in this esteemed genre. One constituent of the quickly rising attractiveness and worldwide high-quality interpretation was that Bartók's notation for string quartet appeared to be much more precise, elaborated, and consistent than e.g. the notation of different work groups in his piano music. His idiomatic and innovative writing for strings in a way exercised greater impact on post-war composers than Bartók's compositional system.  Based on recent source studies connected with the editorial work on the forthcoming two string quartet volumes of the Bartók critical edition I will discuss: (1) preliminary and revised concepts of the whole work or individual movements in string quartets nos. 1 and 3-6 on the evidence of sketches and the draft; (2) the significance of past and contemporary models and influences; (3) text corruption in no.1, notational problems in no. 2; (4) the source value of the four known contemporary recordings (1925 no. 2 by Amar-Hindemith, 1936 no. 1 by Pro Arte, 1936 no. 2 by Budapest, 1941 no. 5 by Kolisch Quartet).

Restricted access

Revised critical edition of Hyperides in Timandrum .

Restricted access

Indologists in Honour of Prof. Csaba Töttössy. Delhi, pp. 185–207. Hidas, G. (2009): Mahāpratisarā-Mahāvidyārājñī, The Great Amulet, Great Queen of Spells. Introduction, Critical Editions and Annotated Translation . DPhil Thesis

Restricted access

Bibliografia Aqtay , G. ( 2009 ): Eliyahu ben Yosef Qılcı’s Anthology of Crimean Karaim and Turkish Literature. Critical Edition with Introduction, Indexes and

Restricted access

An analysis of a Poliziano’s translation of Callimachus’fifth hymn with a critical edition of the text.

Restricted access