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9 9. Rand, N. (1996) Crystal violet can be used to visualise DNA bands during gel electrophoresis and to improve cloning efficiency. Technical Tips Online www

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Abstract  

The mechanochemical solid-state adsorption of the cationic dye crystal violet (CV) by montmorillonite was investigated by XRD and simultaneous DTA-TG. Solid CV was ground with the clay for 5 min and four different varieties of CV mechanochemically treated clay were investigated. X-ray and DTA data were compared with those of CV-montmorillonite obtained from an aqueous suspension. X-ray and DTA studies of a ground mixture and a ground mixture heated at 110°C suggest that the mechanochemical adsorption of organic cations takes place on the external surfaces of the clay. The study of a ground mixture washed with water, and washed with water and acetone reveal that water is essential for the penetration of CV into the interlayer space.

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Abstract  

Adsorption of erythrosin-B (EB) and fast green (FG) to a non-charged organosmectite based on crystal violet adsorbed up to 100% of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) was tested. Adsorption isotherms of EB and FG were prepared at 3, 24 and 50C. All isotherms are of H-type reaching loads of approximately up to 20% of the original CEC of the crude montmorillonite (up to 0.15 and 0.10 mol dye kg–1 clay for EB and FG, respectively). Adsorption decreases with temperature, indicating an exothermic process. Enthalpy was evaluated using van’t Hoff equation, yielding approximately –20 kJ mol–1 for both dyes.

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Abstract  

An isotopic dilution method for the determination of traces of molybdenum has been developed. The method consists of the complexation Mo(V)-SCN with substoichiometric quantities of crystal violet, and its subsequent extraction into chloroform. This procedure was successfully tested for the determination of molybdenum in the range of 0.5 to 20 g.

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Abstract  

Aqueous solution of crystal violet has been evaluated spectrophotometrically as a gamma-ray chemical dosimeter. The response of the chemical dosimetric system has also been investigated under different environmental conditions, such as light and temperature. In the present study the response has been measured at two wavelengths; 588 nm (λmax of the irradiated solution) and 500 nm. The response of the crystal violet dosimeter was linear in the dose range of 50–550 Gy at pH 5.6 when absorption measurements were made at 588 and 500 nm. The response of the crystal violet dosimeter during post-irradiation storage at room temperature in dark showed slight decrease in absorbance at 588 and 510 nm but the response was almost stable at 460 nm. For higher doses, the change in the response was greater as compared to the low doses. Post-irradiation stability during diffused sunlight showed significant decrease in the response for higher dose at 588 and 510 nm and slower decrease in the response for lower dose at the above mentioned wavelengths. However the response was almost stable up to 97 days at 460 nm for higher and lower doses. At 4 °C, the decrease in the absorbance was slower at 588 and 510 nm while the response was almost constant at 460 nm. At higher temperatures, such as 40 °C, the decrease in the absorbance was greater at 588 and 510 nm while at 460 nm the absorbance was almost constant for about 3 months.

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defined as MDR based on the recommendations of Magiorakos et al. [ 4 ]. Crystal violet (CV) tube-adherence biofilm-production assay Screening for biofilm-formation in the isolates was carried out using the

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-forming ability of M. anserisalpingitidis was examined by the crystal violet assay ( McAuliffe et al., 2006 ). Additionally, the effect of biofilm formation on the resistance of M. anserisalpingitidis strains against heat, desiccation and eight different

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h. Wells were then washed three times with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and fixed with 200 µL of 99% methanol (Merck) for 15 min. Plates were stained with 0.1% crystal violet for 15 min. The stained biofilm was solubilised with 160 µL of

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