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Abstract  

The daily intake of uranium (238U) by an urban Indian adult population was estimated by the analysis of a duplicate diet, drinking water, and air samples using neutron activation and radio-chemical separation. The uranium intake through food is 0.55 g which is much larger than that from drinking water and air, at 0.09 and 0.01 g, respectively. The total daily dietary intake of uranium, calculated from the concentrations measured in the individual food ingredients and their daily consumption (based on the national survey), is found to be 2.2 g which is a factor of 3.5 higher than that based on a duplicate urban diet. The maximum contribution to the daily intake is found to be from cereals. The lower intake by the urban population is most likely due to their lower food consumption.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
M. Al-Masri
,
H. Mukallati
,
A. Al-Hamwi
,
H. Khalili
,
M. Hassan
,
H. Assaf
,
Y. Amin
, and
A. Nashawati

Abstract  

More than one hundred different food stuffs (meat, vegetables cereals, seafood,..) have been collected during 1998, 1999 and 2000 and analyzed for radioactivity as part of the National Food Monitoring Program in Syria. Results have shown that most of the observed concentrations were within the range of the worldwide values with the exception of relatively high levels of 210Po being observed in fish, vegetables, mushrooms, herbs and flowers. The daily intakes of the radionuclides studied have been evaluated. Relatively high values, in comparison with some countries, were found for 210Po (1.9 Bq/day). This is due to high content of 210Po in wheat (2.3 Bq/kg) consumed by Syrians, the daily consumption of wheat by Syrians is about 526 g. In addition, natural and artificial radionuclides in some manufactured food of Syrian infant and their intake rates have been determined. Seventeen manufactured food and eleven types of canned milk were collected from the local market and their radioactivity analyzed. 210Po activity concentration varied between 0.38 and 2.89 Bq/kg dry wt. in canned milk while the highest concentration in infant food was found to be 1.69 Bq/kg dry wt. Other radionuclide concentrations were below the limit of detection of 3 Bq/kg dry wt. and 4 Bq/kg dry wt. for 226Ra and 228Ra, respectively, while uranium concentration varied between 2.2 and 10.5 µg/kg dry wt. in milk samples and 0.78-6.0 µg/kg dry wt. in other food samples.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors:
S. Ko
,
K. Shiraishi
,
S. K. Sahoo
,
K. Ayama
,
Y. Muramatsu
,
I. P. Los
,
V. N. Korzun
,
N. Y. Tsigankov
, and
P. V. Zamostyan

Summary  

The concentration of stable iodine and bromine in Ukrainian milk has been determined in relation to the effect of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. The geometric mean of iodine and bromine concentration was 31.0mg/kg and 2.57 mg/kg, respectively. Compared with Japanese milk, it was statistically lower. Bromine concentrations in Ukrainian and Japanese milk were not significantly different. Contribution of milk to daily intake of iodine and bromine in Ukrainian adults has been estimated to 88% and 94%.

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Abstract  

Diet samples were collected by a duplicate portion study of Japanese adults in two districts, a newly-rising town and an established seaside village, of Ishikawa Prefecture, which faces the Sea of Japan. Uranium concentrations in a total of 80 diet samples were determined by -spectrometry after chemical separation. No marked differences between the two districts were found regarding characteristics of food consumption in thirteen categories and in daily intake of238U per person. The daily intake of238U per person ranged from 1.1 to 40 mBq with a geometric mean value of 9.6±2.1 mBq. The234U/238U activity ratios ranged from 0.7–1.5, with most being from 1.0–1.2. The internal dose estimation system (IDES) was completed with Japanese physical parameters and other parameters of ICRP Publication 30, and then the annaul effective dose equivalent was estimated as 3·10–7 Sv for238U in a Japanese adult.

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Abstract  

Selenium daily intake was determined for two small groups of the Portuguese population, based on the analysis of duplicate diet portions. The total amount of food ingested during a day was collected for 18 workers of the Technological and Nuclear Institute (ITN-Sacavém) and for 6 females of Reguengos de Monsaraz, a small town in the south-eastern hinterland. The average selenium daily intake was 43 ± 20 and 32 ± 13 μg per person, respectively, both lower than the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of 55 μg day−1. Selenium in diet samples was determined by replicate sample neutron activation analysis (RSINAA). The method was considered accurate for the selenium determination.

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Abstract  

A simple method employing neutron activation and radiochemical separation was developed for simultaneous determination of the concentrations of232Th(Th) and238U(U) in biological materials. Using this method, it is possible to detect 0.05 and 0.2 ng of Th and U, respectively, in the samples. This method was applied to determine the daily dietary intake of these two nuclides by the population living in the high background areas of India (Monazite area), where the soil contains very high levels of these two nuclides. The comparison of the daily intakes by the population living in high and normal background areas showed significantly higher intake of these two nuclides by the high background population.

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Vegetables are the major source of dietary nitrate, with wide variations in nitrate content. The presence of nitrate in vegetables is often associated with harmful effects on human health, i.e. with toxic effects of methaemoglobinaemia and the possibility of causing an endogenous formation of carcinogenic N-nitroso compounds. However, it is also associated with beneficial health effects, since nitrate represent an important alternative pathway to bioactive NO and its important physiological roles in vascular and immune function. In this review the concentrations of nitrate in different vegetables from different countries are given. Furthermore, the reasons for the different contents of nitrate in vegetables, the daily intakes and comparisons to the acceptable daily intake (ADI) values, legislation, metabolism and toxicology of nitrate are described as well as harmful and beneficial effects of nitrate on human health.

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Abstract  

Fifty representative foods sampled Australia-wide from each of the State capitals were analysed for manganese by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Calculated daily intake of manganese for Australian diets was compared with recommendations by US authorities for the safe and adequate dietary intake of this essential trace element. The contribution of tea to adult daily intakes was determined.

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completely safe. More recent studies showed that coumarin is not a genotoxic carcinogen, so that a certain limited daily intake may be considered acceptable ( EFSA, 2004 ; Abraham et al., 2010 ). In that context, tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.1 mg/kg of

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health risk assessment For assessment of potential human health risks associated with oral intake of antibiotic residues through honey, estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were compared with the already established ADIs for all detected antibiotics to

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