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. Deetz, S. — Cohen, D. — Edley, P. P. (1997): Toward a Dialogic Ethic in the Context of International Business Organization. In: Casmir, F. L. (ed.): Ethics in Intercultural and International Communication. Mahwah, NJ—London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

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= Kristeva Julia: Bachtin, der Dialog, das Wort und der Roman. In: Literaturwissenschaft und Linguistik . Bd. 2. Frankfurt am Main, 1973. 345–375. Lachmann 1990 = Lachmann Renate: Gedächtnis und Literatur . Frankfurt am Main, 1990

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«Диалогичность» как семантическая и семиотическая динамика литературного текста

Семиотика литературы в контексте лингвистики и языковой коммуникации

Studia Slavica
Author: Каталин Кроо

HOLQUIST M. Dialogism. Bakhtin and his World . 2nd edition. London – New York : Routledge , 2005 . HOLQUIST–CLARK 1984

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At the beginning of the series of Augustine’s earliest extant literary works are the three philosophical dialogues Contra Academicos, De beata vita and De ordine, which were composed in the autumn of 386 during Augustine’s otium philosophandi in Cassiciacum. In the introductions of all three works, the marine metaphors are widely used. The author compares human life with a stormy sea and sees as the only salvation the port of philosophy. In beata v. 1. 2 Augutin compares the people to whom philosophy can accommodate with navigantes, which he groups in tria genera. Although the people who belong to the respective group are described in detail, the author does not mention names. This arouses research interest and justifies the attempt to propose a representing person for each group.

The present work sets itself the goal by parallel reading of beata v. 1. 2, with some passages from Cicero’s Epistulae, Tusculanae disputationes and De officiis to make a new proposal. And this in addition to the currently existing assumption that Romanianus, to whom the dialogue Contra Academicos is dedicated, should be considered as a representative of the second group of seafarers. However, the author of the present work now ventures a completely new approach, in which Cicero can be accepted as a representative of this group.

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Abstract  

The events of September 11th have had a deep impact on theoretical discourses. A reality marked by conflicts challenges the widely debated postcolonial theories which for a long time have described cultural contact in conciliatory, consensual terms as “hybridity” or “Third Space”. In the wake of this paradigm shift there has been a renaissance of antagonistically organized concepts such as Huntington’s “clash of civilization”, long considered obsolete. The rhetorical patterns of Franz Fanon, a forgotten founder of postcolonial studies, have also experienced a revival in the daily press since 9/11. In this sense the terrorist attacks are seen as the answer of the “wretched of the earth” to globalization. The recourse to Fanon’s metaphors highlights how far the canonized postcolonial theories of Said, Bhabha and Spivak are removed from their subject and how, due to their “fashionable” status, they have gained a problematic momentum. It also implicitly questions the purpose of theories in general.

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This article proceeds from the notions that composers need advocates and that in postwar new music, they commented more than ever before on their own work. It deals specifically with György Ligeti and focusses on the years between his flight from Hungary in 1956 and his appointment as a professor in Hamburg in 1973. A detailed examination of sources from the composer’s archive in the Paul Sacher Foundation shows how Harald Kaufmann and Ove Nordwall promoted his music and thinking. Ligeti’s own position reveals a rift between his public success and the deeprooted self-consciousness of an immigrant sensitive to all kinds of discrimination. Nevertheless, Ligeti, with his extraordinary clearness, had considerable influence on musical discourse and succeeded in defining an individual profile. An appendix includes six hitherto unpublished letters from Kaufmann to Ligeti.

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Central to translation is cultural anxiety and ambivalence about foreign otherness, which is essentially reified in cultural politics underlying translation. The ubiquity of ideology may be exaggerated or overstated, but it is manifest in a tendency to be seen as primarily bound up with language and art, and the needs of translation are inseparable from the political or cultural concerns in the target language system. The cultural politics of difference has a lot to do with truth-telling, sincerity, intelligibility and empathy. Effective translation depends not only upon a reasonable understanding of the content of the message that has been translated, but also on an ability, on the part of the target reader, to relate that message to the relevant cultural situation by developing a necessary knowledge of foreign otherness in its cultural political context. The artifice or artificiality of sameness entails turning away and reduction, yet cultural impositions are understandably considered as intrusive, and debates on literature and translation, often ideologically charged, tend to center around what foreign otherness is capable of doing or undoing. In defiance of the prevailing political conditions, translation may embrace and introduce foreign political and ethical values.

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