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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Branimir Šimić, Jasenka Ćosić, Vlatka Rozman and Anita Liska

.B.: 1997. Reduced Fusarium Ear Rot and Symptomless Infection in Kernels of Maize Genetically Engineered for European Corn Borer Resistance“. Phytopathology, 87, pp 1071–1077. Showers W

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Kernel samples of two maize hybrids (46308 and 463017) with different levels of resistance to Fusarium ear rot were collected from artificially and naturally infected plants. The spectral characteristics of the samples were analysed with an ASD Fieldspec 3 MAX spectroradiometer in the wavelength range of 350 to 2500 nm using an ex situ method. The different extents of artificial and natural Fusarium infection on the maize kernels resulted in spectral differences detectable with a spectroradiometer. The data showed that for both genotypes the level of Fusarium infection generated by artificial inoculation was significantly higher than that caused by natural infection over a wavelength range of 2030 to 2080 nm. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on the data set for this range revealed that the first component explained 77.0% of the variability for hybrid 46308 and 97.0% for hybrid 46317.

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: Andreas Görtz, Erich-Christian Oerke, Ulrike Steiner, Cees Waalwijk, Ineke Vries and Heinz-Wilhelm Dehne

Logrieco, A., Mule, G., Moretti, A. Bottalico, A. 2002. Toxigenic Fusarium species and mycotoxins associated with maize ear rot in Europe. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 108: 597–609. Bottalico A

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Cereal Research Communications
Authors: K. Gromadzka, M. Wit, K. Górna, J. Chełkowski, A. Waśkiewicz, P. Ochodzki and R. Warzecha

. Munkvold , G.P. , Hellmich , R.L. , Showers , W.B. 1997 . Reduced fusarium ear rot and symptomless infection in kernels of maize genetically engineered for European corn borer resistance . Phytopathol. 87 : 1071 – 1077

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260 Gendloff, E.H., Rossmann, E.C., Casale, W.L., Isleib, T.G., Hart, L.P. 1986. Components of resistance to Fusarium ear rot in field corn. Phytopathology 76 :684

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Ali, M.L., Taylor, J.H., Liu, J., Sun, G., William, M., Kasha, K.J, Reid, L.M. Pauls, K.P. 2005. Molecular mapping of QTLs for resistance to Gibberella ear rot in corn caused by Fusarium graminearum . Genome

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to Ear Rot and Mycotoxin Contamination in Early European Maize Inbred Lines. Crop Sci. In press. Josephs, R.D., Schuhmacher, R., Krska, R. 2001. International interlaboratory study for the determination of the

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. – Headrick , M. J. – Pataky , K. J. – White , G. H. : 2003 . Influence of Cryl Ab protein and hybrid genotype on Fumonisin contamination and Fusarium ear rot of corn . Crop Science . 43 : 1283 – 1293 . 3

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Ostrinia nubilalis (Hübner) (European corn borer) is the main maize pest in Central and South Europe and it promotes Fusarium verticillioides infection on maize grains, which is able to produce fumonisins. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the timing of pyrethroid treatments on European corn borer damage, fungal ear rot and fumonisin contamination. The field experiments were performed from 2005 to 2007 in NW Italy. Four application timings were compared to an untreated control. The insecticide treatments were applied at approximately 10 days intervals, starting from the end of flowering. The last treatment was performed approximately 15 days after the ECB flight peak. At harvest, the ears were rated for the incidence and severity of European corn borer damage and fungal ear rot symptoms, and the harvested kernels were analyzed for fumonisins B 1 +B 2 . In all the years, the treatments applied 7–10 days before the European corn borer adult flight peak showed the best efficacy to control insect damage on ears. Fungal ear rot and fumonisin contamination were clearly affected by European corn borer control. The occurrence of this mycotoxin in plots treated at the best pyrethroid application timing was significantly reduced, on average by 76%, compared to the untreated control. Furthermore, early insecticide applications, at the end of maize flowering, showed significantly lower fumonisin contamination than treatments applied at approximately 15 days after the adult flight peak. This research indicates that the production of maize kernels with low fumonisin content may be enhanced by a correct timing of the insecticide application against second generation European corn borer.

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88 93 Reid, L.M., Hamilton, R.I., Mather, D. E. 1996. Screening Maize for Resistance to Gibberella Ear Rot. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Technical Bulletin. Publication 1996-5E, 25 pp

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