Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • "echinococcus" x
Clear All
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors: János Deák, Gergely Zádori, Adrienn Csiszkó, László Damjanovich and Zsolt Szentkereszty

Introduction Hydatid disease is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus . The most commonly affected organs by hydatid disease are the liver and the lung. Other organs, e.g., muscles, kidneys, brain, bones

Open access

. 11 493 495 Guralp, N. and Dogru, C. 1971: The fertility rates of cysts of Echinococcus in organs of sheep and cattle of various ages slaughtered in

Restricted access
Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Andrea Horváth, Attila Patonay, Dénes Bánhegyi, János Szlávik, György Balázs, Dénes Görög and Klára Werling

Kern, P., Bardonnet, K., Renner, E. és mtsai: European Echinococcus Registry: Human Alveolar Echinococcosis, Europe, 1982–2000. Emerg. Inf. Dis., 2003, 9 , 343–349. Renner E

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Milan Miljević, Olivera Bjelić Čabrilo, Verica Simin, Borislav Čabrilo, Jelena Boganč Miljević and Dušan Lalošević

, S. , Janković , I. L. and Deplazes , P. ( 2018 ): First detection of Echinococcus multilocularis in Croatia . Parasitol. Res. 117 , 617 – 621 . Borgsteede , F. H. M

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: Aleksandra Vergles Rataj, Janez Posedi, Diana Žele and Gorazd Vengušt

Ballek, D. (1991): Zum Vorkommen von Echinococcus multilocularis und anderen Zestoden und Nematoden beim Rotfuchs ( Vulpes vulpes L.) in den Regierungsbezirken Arnsberg, Detmold und Kassel (in German). Dissertation, Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover

Restricted access

Cystic hydatidosis (CH) is a worldwide distributed parasitic zoonosis. It is considered one of the 17 neglected parasitic tropical diseases, among cysticercosis and soil transmitted helminthiases. CH is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, a tapeworm that usually infects dogs and other carnivorous animals as definitive hosts and herbivorous animals and rarely humans as intermediate hosts. Main primary localizations are the liver and the lung. In less than 3% they can primarily be present in the spleen. Treatment is mainly surgical, in some cases resulting in reoccurrence. In this paper we present the case of a male 55 years old patient who underwent a surgical intervention on his spleen for a solitary hydatid cyst as primary localization. Fifteen years after the operation the patient presented macroscopic haematuria; routine laboratory findings presented soft eosinophilia, 5%, without any other modification. There was found no palpable tumour in the pelvis by rectal examination. Abdominal ultrasound investigation revealed a 2×1 cm formation in the urinary bladder at the base of the left bladder-wall and a retrovesical, inhomogeneous 10×10 cm tumour with multiple septa and transonic zones. Computed tomography (CT) scan strongly suggested the presence of a bladder tumour and a hydatid cyst. The symptoms caused by the bladder tumour revealed the co-existing non-symptomatic retrovesical secondary CH, which is a rare complication of splenic Echinococcus granulosus infection. Close follow-up and a proper pre- and postoperative anti-parasitic medication of the patient could have prevented reoccurrence of CH.

Restricted access
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors: András Takács, László Szabó, Lajos Juhász, András Takács, József Lanszki, Péter Takács and Miklós Heltai

In Hungary, twenty Canis aureus individuals were submitted to parasitological examinations in 2010–2012. Two Coccidia: Cystoisospora canis (15%) and Toxoplasma-type oocysts (5%), one Trematoda: Alaria alata (10%), six Cestoda: Mesocestoides lineatus (20%), Echinococcus granulosus (10%), Dipylidium caninums (5%), Taenia hydatigena (15%), Taenia pisiformis (20%), Taenia crassiceps (40%), and nine Nematoda: Angiostrongylus vasorum (10%), Crenosoma vulpis (30%), Capillaria aerophila (5%), Toxocara canis (20%), Toxascaris leonina (15%), Trichuris vulpis (10%), Ancylostoma caninum (45%), Uncinaria stenocephala (40%), Capillaria plica (45%) have been identified. Angiostronglyus vasorum has been reported from carnivores in Europe, Africa, South America and North America. The helminth A. vasorum or French heartworm is a metastrongylid nematode, widely distributed in Western Europe, that infects the pulmonary arterial tree of dogs, various species of foxes, wolves, Eurasian badgers, coyotes and stoats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural A. vasorum infection in golden jackal.

Restricted access

Bruzsa B.: Echinococcus tömlők átfuródása. Orvosok Lapja, 1948, 4 , 1158–1159. Bruzsa B. Echinococcus tömlők átfuródása Orvosok Lapja

Restricted access

Sharma , B. ( 1998 ): Random amplified polymorphic DNA for the specific detection of bubaline Echinococcus granulosus by hybridisation assay . Vet. Parasitol. 79 , 315 – 323

Restricted access

-Fernandez , M. T. , Silva , M. , Bravo , I. , Santos , N. , Deplazes , P. and Carvalho , L. M. M. D. ( 2013 ): Taeniid species of the Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) in Portugal with special focus on Echinococcus spp . Int. J. Parasitol

Restricted access