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a very low load for resistance exercise could induce volitional failure and to compare the acute muscular response [exercise induced changes in muscle thickness, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and surface electromyography (EMG) amplitude

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electromyography (EMG) activity measurements were conducted to document and compare any significant changes between the treatment sessions. In addition, fasting blood samples before and after treatment were collected to assess LA levels and hormonal responses. For

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coefficient of variation for this measurement was calculated as 2% and the minimal difference was calculated as 0.2 cm using methods described previously ( 26 ). Surface electromyography (sEMG) sEMG was recorded from the

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A motoros egységek aktivitásának változása a biceps brachii izomban különböző intenzitású izometriás terhelések hatására

Changes in motor unit activity in the biceps brachii muscle under different intensities of isometric loading

Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Ádám Hegedüs
and
Bence Ádám Kopper

(Basel) 2021; 9: 88. 24 Horváth M, Fazekas G. Assessment of motor impairment with electromyography – the kinesiological EMG. [Mozgáskárosodás felmérése

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Acta Veterinaria Hungarica
Authors:
Á. Pákozdy
,
M. Leschnik
,
B. Nell
,
U. Kolm
,
Z. Virányi
,
B. Belényi
,
M. Molnár
, and
T. Bilzer

Two related European Grey wolves ( Canis lupus ) with the history of muscle stiffness beginning at 2 weeks of age were examined in this study. Muscle tone and muscle mass were increased in both animals. Muscle stiffness was worsened by stress so that the animals fell into lateral recumbency. Blood chemistry revealed mildly increased serum creatine kinase activity. Abnormal potentials typical of myotonic discharges were recorded by electromyography. Cataract, first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block and inhomogeneous myocardial texture by ultrasound suggested extramuscular involvement. Myopathology demonstrated dystrophic signs in the muscle biopsy specimen. The presumptive diagnosis based on the in vivo findings was myotonic dystrophy. Immunochemistry of the striated muscles revealed focal absence of dystrophin 1 and beta-dystroglycan in both cases. Cardiac and ophthalmologic involvement suggested a disorder very similar to a human form of myotonic dystrophy. This is the first description of myotonic dystrophy in wolves.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
Robert Thiebaud
,
J.P. Loenneke
,
C.A. Fahs
,
D. Kim
,
X. Ye
,
T. Abe
,
K. Nosaka
, and
M.G. Bemben

Discrepancies exist whether blood flow restriction (BFR) exacerbates exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). This study compared low-intensity eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with and without BFR for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage. Nine untrained young men (18–26 y) performed low-intensity (30% 1RM) eccentric contractions (2-s) of the elbow flexors with one arm assigned to BFR and the other arm without BFR. EIMD markers of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque, range of motion (ROM), upper arm circumference, muscle thickness and muscle soreness were measured before, immediately after, 1, 2, 3, and 4 days after exercise. Electromyography (EMG) amplitude of the biceps brachii and brachioradialis were recorded during exercise. EMG amplitude was not significantly different between arms and did not significantly change from set 1 to set 4 for the biceps brachii but increased for the brachioradialis (p ≤ 0.05, 12.0% to 14.5%) when the conditions were combined. No significant differences in the changes in any variables were found between arms. MVC torque decreased 7% immediately post-exercise (p ≤ 0.05), but no significant changes in ROM, circumference, muscle thickness and muscle soreness were found. These results show that BFR does not affect EIMD by low-intensity eccentric contractions.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors:
Jeremy Loenneke
,
C. Fahs
,
R. Thiebaud
,
L. Rossow
,
T. Abe
,
Xin Ye
,
D. Kim
, and
M. Bemben

The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms behind the blood flow restriction (BFR) stimulus in the absence of exercise. Nine participants completed a 10 minute time control and then a BFR protocol. The protocol was five, 5-minute bouts of inflation with 3-minutes of deflation between each bout. The pressure was set relative to each individual’s thigh circumference. Significant increases in muscle thickness were observed for both the vastus lateralis (VL) [6%, p = 0.027] and rectus femoris (RF) [22%, p = 0.001] along with a significant decrease in plasma volume [15%, p = 0.001]. Ratings of discomfort during the BFR protocol peaked at 2.7 (light discomfort). There were no significant changes with whole blood lactate, electromyography (EMG), or heart rate (HR), however, there was a trend for a significant increase in HR during the 5th inflation (p = 0.057). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that the attenuation of both muscle atrophy and declines in strength previously observed with brief applications of BFR may have been mediated through an acute fluid shift induced increase in muscle size. This is supported by our finding that the changes in muscle thickness are maintained even after the cuffs have been removed.

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active muscle has recently been shown to cause a shift in electromyography (EMG) patterns ( 2–7 , 10 , 12 , 13 ). WBV applied over upper limbs has increased the muscular performance and EMG activity in a healthy population ( 8–11 , 15

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Ádám Bach
,
Balázs Sztanó
,
József Géza Kiss
,
Gerd Fabian Volk
,
Andreas Müller
,
Claus Pototschnig
, and
László Rovó

] 2 Sataloff RT, Mandel S, Mann EA, et al. Practice parameter: laryngeal electromyography (an evidence-based review). J Voice 2004; 18: 261–274. 3 Blitzer A

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, although non-invasive, are not sufficient for quantification and they lack reproducibility ( 13 , 34 ). Respiratory and other skeletal muscles are controlled by rate coding and recruitment of motor units (MUs). Electromyography (EMG) can

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