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By analyzing enunciation in performance, this article shows the similarities among funeral laments, epic songs, exile songs and the playing of the duduk (oboe). Regarded as “words on” (kilamê ser), these four types of enunciation share melodic, metric, gestural and emotional elements. According to local typologies, the “words on” are opposed to songs (stran), a term referring mostly to wedding music and the zurna (oboe). The opposition between word and song is also related to a series of antinomic couples, such as exile vs. household, sadness vs. joy, or duduk vs. zurna. An analysis of these music and enunciation typologies of emotion allows an approach to Yezidi ritual and calendar time.

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Complementary neurophysiological recordings in macaques and functional neuroimaging in humans show that the primary taste cortex in the rostral insula and adjoining frontal operculum provides separate and combined representations of the taste, temperature, and texture (including viscosity and fat texture) of food in the mouth independently of hunger and thus of reward value and pleasantness. One synapse on, in the orbitofrontal cortex, these sensory inputs are for some neurons combined by learning with olfactory and visual inputs. Different neurons respond to different combinations, providing a rich representation of the sensory properties of food. The representation of taste and other food-related stimuli in the orbitofrontal cortex of macaques is found from its lateral border throughout area 13 to within 7 mm of the midline, and in humans the representation of food-related and other pleasant stimuli is found particularly in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. In the orbitofrontal cortex, feeding to satiety with one food decreases the responses of these neurons to that food, but not to other foods, showing that sensory-specific satiety is computed in the primate (including human) orbitofrontal cortex. Consistently, activation of parts of the human orbitofrontal cortex correlates with subjective ratings of the pleasantness of the taste and smell of food. Cognitive factors, such as a word label presented with an odour, influence the pleasantness of the odour, and the activation produced by the odour in the orbitofrontal cortex. Food intake is thus controlled by building a multimodal representation of the sensory properties of food in the orbitofrontal cortex, and gating this representation by satiety signals to produce a representation of the pleasantness or reward value of food which drives food intake. A neuronal representation of taste is also found in the pregenual cingulate cortex, which receives inputs from the orbitofrontal cortex, and in humans many pleasant stimuli activate the pregenual cingulate cortex, pointing towards this as an important area in motivation and emotion.

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indirectly suggested the centrality of failures in emotion regulation (ER; Blaszczynski & Nower, 2002 ; Jacobs, 1986 ; Lesieur, 2001 ; McCormick, 1988 ; McDougall, 2004 ; Olsen, Lugo, & Sutterlin, 2015 ; Sharpe, 2002 ). ER refers to a transdiagnostic

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References W. Arsenio E. Lemerise 2001 Varieties of childhood bullying: Values, emotion

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depression, are associated with concurrent difficulties in emotion regulation ( Aldao, Nolen-Hoeksema & Schweizer, 2010 ; Hofmann, Sawyer, Fang, & Asnaani, 2012 ), that is, the process by which individuals influence which emotions they have, when they have

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Ana Estévez
,
Paula Jáuregui
,
Inmaculada Sánchez-Marcos
,
Hibai López-González
, and
Mark D. Griffiths

in determining individuals’ abilities to develop skills for coping with life’s difficulties ( Mikulincer & Shaver, 2007 ). Minors learn, through their experiences with attachment figures, how to cope with negative emotions and angst when

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Introduction Emotion regulation refers to the psychological processes whereby individuals influence which emotions they have, when they have them, and how they experience and express these emotions ( Carl, Soskin, Kerns

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Maria Picó-Pérez
,
Víctor Costumero
,
Juan Verdejo-Román
,
Natalia Albein-Urios
,
José Miguel Martínez-González
,
Carles Soriano-Mas
,
Alfonso Barrós-Loscertales
, and
Antonio Verdejo-Garcia

, 2019 ). Moreover, elevated impulsivity and altered reward processing, decision making and emotion regulation feature both disorders ( Lee et al., 2019 ; Michalczuk, Bowden-Jones, Verdejo-Garcia, & Clark, 2011 ; Zilverstand, Parvaz, Moeller

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Az affektív tényezők szerepe a végrehajtó funkcióban: A „meleg” végrehajtó funkció

The role of affective factors in executive function: The hot executive function

Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle
Authors:
Gabriella Józsa
and
Krisztián Józsa

. Fredrickson , B. L. , & Branigan , C. ( 2005 ). Positive emotions broaden the scope of attention and thought-action repertoires . Cognition and Emotion , 19 , 313 – 332 . Friedman , N

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). Available evidence convincingly shows that GDPs hold exaggerated or biased beliefs in the five domains (see Goodie & Fortune, 2013 , for a review). The novelty of this study relies on its focus on the potential entrenchment between emotion

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