Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "epic poetry" x
  • All content x
Clear All

Augustus in der Hirtenwelt

Die Darstellung des idealen Herrschers in der neulateinischen Bukolik

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Lajos Zoltán Simon

In the early modern age, pastoral poetry became a current genre of the praise of rulers, kings and emperors. In spite of its overwhelming richness and contemporaneous importance, this branch of the bucolic genre has received relatively little attention from researchers. Even in comprehensive works on the history of the genre, one often finds hasty remarks, e.g. that these panegyric poems were foremost influenced by Vergil’s Eclogue 4.

The present paper offers a short overview of the immense diversity of the genre, paying great attention not only to Vergil, but also to the decisive influence of Calpurnius Siculus, Sannazaro and Baptista Mantuanus, as well as to the techniques of the Kreuzung der Gattungen, mainly to the interaction between pastoral and epic poetry. The analysis shows that, in spite of the huge variety of forms and the large distances in time and space, the image of the ideal emperor is surprisingly constant, and that the picture of the mythical Golden Age is almost completely drawn with the motives of the idealized reign of Augustus taken from epic poetry.

Restricted access

Cato und die Bienen •

Zur Rezeption der vergilischen Georgica in Einigen Gleichnissen Lucans

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Markus Kersten

The paper focuses on the bee-simile (9. 283–293) and its application to Cato. Via a detailed analysis of the motif, the passage, and the context as well as the inter- and intratextual aspects of Lucan’s Bildsprache (especially with respect to Vergil’s Georgics) the author discusses how the Lucanean Cato can be understood and how he may be assessed with regard to an interpretation of the narrative as a whole. The elaborate simile not only gives a frightening insight into the figure’s character, but also, by evoking the similes previously used for Pompey, it inevitably draws the characters into relation with each other. The famous, but perhaps simplistic idea that Cato, the perfect stoic and republican, is the real ‘hero’of the poem, is challenged.

Restricted access

The article investigates the uses of the motif of the Warrior Women in János Arany’s epic poetry. The author of the article claims that the motif of the Warrior Women in Arany’s poetical discourse stemmed from the romantic literary tradition of the 1820–1830s. Furthermore, she argues that an old Scottish ballad, purportedly known by János Arany, provided the pattern that had been imitated by the Hungarian poet. Hence, the romantic image of the Hungarian Warrior Woman has become a highly symbolic and propagandistic content in Arany’s poetry during the 1850s. It reveals a genuine nineteenth-century endeavour of the nation-building process in order to promote the nation’s ready-to-fight patriotic women as models to be followed.

Restricted access

in Current Research . Delhi. Bangha, I. (forthcoming2): Early Hindi Epic Poetry in Gwalior: Beginnings and Continuities in the Rāmāyan of Vishnudas. In: F. Orsini (ed.): After Timur Came . Delhi

Restricted access

Abstract  

The present article explores the way how medieval people thought about time and organized their lives in light of the constant passing of time. Whereas modern philosophers and historians have generally credited the Middle Ages with a radically different time concept in contrast to the modern world, here I will argue that occasionally the differences were considerably less stringent and perhaps not even existent. Often, quite naturally, the mental-historical framework was deeply influenced by the Catholic Church which perceived human life within the extremes of life and death, or of secular time and eternity. The analysis will take us from Old High German heroic epic poetry represented by the “Hildebrandslied” with its noteworthy emphasis on the many years in which the father did not see his son, to the late Middle Ages when Oswald von Wolkenstein, through his poetry, and Helene Kottannerin, through her unique diary, indicated their full awareness of the meaning of time in its measurable quality. Not every author reflected the same concept of time, and many of them simply took their readers to the timeless world of King Arthur. Other authors, however, such as the Stricker, expressed a clear idea of time almost in the modern sense of the word by way of positioning their protagonists in problematic situations when they are suddenly pressed for time and need to reach painful decisions. The article does not intend to blur the differences between the Middle Ages and our own cultural period, but it wants to deconstruct the romantic sentiment that the consciousness of time prevalent in the Middle Ages was completely different to the modern concept of time.

Restricted access

Epic Poetry]. Csíkszereda : Pallas-akadémia Könyvkiadó . Demény , István Pál 1999 a Bika képében viaskodó táltosok a régi Kínában [Táltos Battling in the Shape of Bulls in Ancient China]. In Idem. Táltosok, kerekek, lángok. Összehasonlító

Restricted access

), riddle, children’s song, myth, epic poetry ( Vukelić 2014 :245), and that there are elements that link a belief narrative to other prose genres (e.g., Milosević Đorđević 2000 ; Radulović 2012 ). Taking into consideration the specifics of belief

Restricted access

and convincing way how Zsigmond Szendrey, the initiator of the collection, tried to collect the epic poetry material in Nagyszalonta based on outdated principles, how unprepared and sometimes misguided his student collectors were, and how Kodály, who

Restricted access