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Anderson, M. 2003. Ethnography as Translation. In: Petrilli, S. (ed) Translation Translation . Amsterdam: Rodopi. 389–398. Anderson M

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Bibliografia N . N. 1906 : Útmutató Néprajzi Múzeumok szervezésére. [Guide to the organisation of museums of ethnography.] Múzeumi és könyvtári kézikönyvek . Múzeumok és Könyvtárak Országos Felügyelosége , Budapest . B ENDA Borbála

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Abstract

In the accounts of early twentieth-century modernism the ethnographic object and its ‘discovery’ by avant-garde artists has come to occupy a central role. But the African studies by the German author and critic Carl Einstein (1885–1940) and the Latvian artist Vladimir Markov (1877–1914) have regularly been demoted to the footnotes of primitivist appropriations. In the histories of non-Western cultures and the anthropology of art both have endured a place in obscurity. Described as ‘the first and most influential’ of the ‘champions of primitive art’, Einstein's Negerplastik has regained some recognition, whereas Markov's Iskusstvo Negrov remains the lesser known of the two books. Emerging at the same historical juncture both authors postulated the limits of Western artistic traditions by advocating the aesthetic autonomy of non-Western sculpture. By introducing a comparative reading, this paper argues that the image/text strategies of both studies orchestrated a poetics of alterity that was central to their respective theoretical agendas and indicative of the politically charged cultural exchanges within the early-twentieth-century avant-garde. In addition to their seemingly analogous motivations it is proposed that their ‘ethnographic turn’ was based, nevertheless, upon conflicting approaches that betray their individual philosophical and artistic affiliations.

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-site . In Falzon , Mark-Anthony (ed.) Multi-Sited Ethnography. Theory, Praxis and Locality in Contemporary Research , 25 – 46 . Farnham – Burlington : Ashgate . Clifford , James 1997 Spatial Practices: Fieldwork, Travel, and the Disciplining of

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Introduction In this article, I explore a group of Roma mothers’ views on and experiences with education for their children in Norway. 2 The study adopts an ethnographic approach, drawing on fieldwork conducted in Oslo, the

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[Chapters from the History of Material Culture in the Middle Ages I] , 69 – 134 . Budapest : L’Harmattan Kiadó — MTA Néprajzi Kutatóintézet . (Documentatio Ethnographica 26.) Bellon , Tibor 2003 A Tisza néprajza [Ethnography of the Tisza

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národopise v první polovině devadesátých let 19. století [Towards the Czech-Slovak Relation in Ethnography in the Mid-1890s] . Slovenský národopis 32 ( 4 ): 605 – 617 . B rouček

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References Cited Barabás , Jenő et al . (eds.) 1959 Magyar Néprajzi Atlasz Gyűjtési Útmutató. [A Guide for the Collectors of Hungarian Ethnographic Atlas] . Budapest : k.n . Bodrogi , Tibor 1954 A néprajzi anyaggyűjtés módszere

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Symposium.), 151 – 160 . Budapest : Hungarian Ethnographical Society (Magyar Néprajzi Társaság) – Museum of Ethnography (Néprajzi Múzeum). Balogh , Balázs 2013 Ungarische Gemeinschaften in West-Pennsylvania [Hungarian Communities in West

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Sándor Bálint was an important representative of ethnography in Hungary in the 20th century. In many respects his work is unique: in its themes and from the geographical and methodological viewpoints. His research strengthened and fully developed ethnology of religion, while through his work the peasant and bourgeois culture of the town of Szeged and its vicinity are the best known in Hungary. He was a very prolific writer. This short article can give only brief glimpses of his work.

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