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Abstract

One possible form of how children use parental models in their social relations would be if children showed more willingness to make friends with peers resembling their parents. To test this possibility, composite faces created from 3 to 6 year old children's photos were transformed to resemble facial images of their parents. The children were asked to show which one of the two same-sex transforms they find more appealing: the familial or the control face. Children who lived in emotional proximity to their parents, and in particular to their mothers, were attracted more to father-resembling faces than to unfamiliar ones. These results suggest that childhood experiences influence face preferences. This bias may affect social decisions later in adulthood, and could help to explain preferences for parent-resembling mates.

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M. J. Law Smith 2008 Effects of menstrual cycle phase on face preferences Archives of Sexual Behavior 37 78 84

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. A. C. Little H. Mannion 2006 Viewing attractive or unattractive same-sex individuals changes self-rated attractiveness and face preferences in women

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D. M. Burt L. K. Murray R. Minamisawa 1999 Menstrual cycle alters face preference

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Journal of Evolutionary Psychology
Authors: Lisa L. M. Welling, Benedict C. Jones, Lisa M. Debruine, Anthony C. Little and Finlay G. Smith

D.R. Feinberg 2007 Social transmission of face preferences among humans Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 274 899

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. Feinberg M. J. LAW Smith 2008 Effects of menstrual cycle phase on face preferences Archives of Sexual Behavior 37

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Journal of Evolutionary Psychology
Authors: Benedict C. Jones, Lisa M. Debruine, Anthony C. Little and David R. Feinberg

R. Minamisawa 1999 Menstrual cycle alters face preference Nature 399 741 742

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Journal of Evolutionary Psychology
Authors: D. E. Re, V. Coetzee, D. Xiao, D. Buls, B. P. Tiddeman, L. G. Boothroyd and D. I. Perrett

Abstract

Experience-dependent changes in mate choice preferences may confer an evolutionary benefit by shifting preferences towards traits that are advantageous for specific environments. Previous studies have demonstrated that prolonged exposure to one type of face biases perceptions of subsequently viewed faces and exposure to one type of body biases perceptions of subsequently viewed bodies. We tested whether preferences in facial adiposity were affected by viewing heavy or light bodies. We first assessed facial adiposity preferences by asking Caucasian participants (n = 59) to transform three-dimensional female Caucasian faces along a body mass index (BMI) continuum until they reached optimal attractiveness. Participants then viewed heavy- or light-bodied two-dimensional images with the faces cropped out before repeating the face preference task. Male and female participants who viewed heavy bodies shifted preferences toward significantly higher facial adiposity, while those who viewed the light bodies showed no significant overall shift. These results provide evidence that adaptation to certain body types affects subsequent preferences for facial adiposity, and suggest that adaptation to one body domain may affect preferences in other body domains.

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Sensation seeking and men's face preferences Evolution and Human Behavior 28 439 446 . J. H. Langlois

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Journal of Evolutionary Psychology
Authors: Paul J. Fraccaro, Benedict C. Jones, Jovana Vukovic, Finlay G. Smith, Christopher D. Watkins, David R. Feinberg, Anthony C. Little and Lisa M. Debruine

Sensation seeking and men's face preferences Evolution and Human Behavior 28 439 446 . B. C. Jones

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