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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Szabolcs Vigvári, Zsuzsanna Nemes, Áron Vincze, Jenő Solt, Dávid Sipos, Zsófia Feiszt, Ágnes Kappéter, Beáta Kovács and Zoltán Péterfi

, 26 (3), 273–280. Rohlke, F., Stollman, F.: Fecal microbiota transplantation in relapsing Clostridium difficile infection. Therap. Adv. Gastroenterol., 2012, 5 (6), 403

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reintroduction of a complex microbiota into the host via fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a well-known therapeutical approach dating back to the Chinese Dong-jin dynasty in the fourth century [ 21 ] and has undergone a renaissance for the treatment of

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Szabolcs Vigvári, Áron Vincze, Jenő Solt, Dávid Sipos, Zsófia Feiszt, Beáta Kovács, Ágnes Kappéter and Zoltán Péterfi

has been devoted to the search for new strategies of recurrent CDI. It was recently suggested that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a relatively safe, low cost, and effective solution of CDI that fails to resolve in response to traditional

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Szabolcs Vigvári, Dávid Sipos, Jenő Solt, Áron Vincze, Béla Kocsis, Zsuzsanna Nemes, Ágnes Kappéter, Zsófia Feiszt, Beáta Kovács and Zoltán Péterfi

), which emerged in the early 2000s, CDI tends to be less responsive to conventional therapy and both of the proportion of recurrent and severe episodes have risen [ 6, 7 ]. Recently published papers suggest that faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Szabolcs Vigvári, Dávid Sipos, Ágnes Kappéter, Zsófia Feiszt, Beáta Kovács and Zoltán Péterfi

metronidazole, as the first-line treatment for CDIs, is less costly. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and vancomycin are more effective [ 31 ]. We have experienced that in 652 cases (73.6%), metronidazole alone was effective and in 90 cases (10.2%), the

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Secondary abiotic mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment provide a valuable tool for association studies with microbiota derived from different vertebrate hosts. We here generated human microbiota-associated (hma) mice by human fecal microbiota transplantation of secondary abiotic mice and performed a comprehensive survey of the intestinal microbiota dynamics in offspring of hma mice over 18 weeks following weaning as compared to their mothers applying both cultural and molecular methods. Mice were maintained under standard hygienic conditions with open cages, handled under aseptic conditions, and fed autoclaved chow and water. Within 1 week post weaning, fecal loads of commensal enterobacteria and enterococci had decreased, whereas obligate anaerobic bacteria such as Bacteroides/Prevotella species and clostridia were stably colonizing the intestines of hma offspring at high loads. Lactobacilli numbers were successively increasing until 18 weeks post weaning in both hma offspring and mothers, whereas by then, bifidobacteria were virtually undetectable in the former only. Interestingly, fecal lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were higher in mothers as compared to their offspring at 5 and 18 weeks post weaning. We conclude that the intestinal microbiota composition changes in offspring of hma mice, but also their mothers over time particularly affecting aerobic and microaerobic species.

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(i.e., secondary abiotic mice) following broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment were unaffected from high-dose T. gondii infection, secondary abiotic mice with a reconstituted murine gut microbiota following fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT

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abiotic mice were associated with human gut microbiota by peroral fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as described earlier [ 14 – 16 ]. To assure human commensal bacterial establishment within the murine intestinal ecosystem, mice were kept for 2 weeks

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Gastroenterol. 2015; 21: 12322–12333. 25 Kakihana K, Fujioka Y, Suda W, et al. Fecal microbiota transplantation for patients with steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease of the

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2012 40 1 8 Kelly, C. R., Leon, L., Jasutkar, N.: Fecal microbiota transplantation for relapsing

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