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Guo, B., Harstall, C., Louie, T., et al.: Systematic review: faecal transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther., 2012, 35 , 865–875. Louie T

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.: Systematic review: faecal transplantation for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther., 2012, 35 , 865–875. Louie T. Systematic review: faecal

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Vincze, Á.: Fecal transplantation. [Székletátültetés.] Magyar Belorvosi Archívum, 2015, 68 (3), 153–155. [Hungarian] 55 Chen, Z., Guo, L., Zhang, Y., et al

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Anantashwamy, A.: Faecal transplant eases symptoms of Parkinson’s. New Scientist, 19 January 2011. Testerman, T.: Ulcer bacteria may contribute to development of Parkinson’s disease. General Meeting of the American

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Abstract

Escherichia coli K12 (EcK12) is commonly used for gene technology purposes and regarded as a security strain due to its inability to adhere to epithelial cells. The conventional intestinal microbiota composition is critical for physiological colonization resistance against most bacterial species including pathogens. We were therefore interested whether intestinal colonization by a genetically modified EcK12 (W3110) strain carrying a chloramphenicol resistance cassette was facilitated following broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment eradicating the intestinal microbiota or induction of small intestinal inflammation accompanied by distinct microbiota shifts. Whereas conventional C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice had virtually expelled the EcK12 (W3110) strain within the first 3 days upon peroral infection, EcK12 (W3110) could establish within the small and large intestines of gnotobiotic mice generated by quintuple antibiotic treatment. Gnotobiotic mice perorally infected with EcK12 (W3110) plus fecal transplant from conventional donors harbored lower intestinal EcK12 (W3110) loads compared to animals challenged with EcK12 (W3110) alone. Furthermore, EcK12 (W3110) infection of conventional mice after but not before induction of ileitis resulted in stable colonization of ileum and colon by EcK12 (W3110). Taken together, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and intestinal inflammation compromise colonization resistance and thus facilitate colonization of the intestinal tract with genetically modified EcK12 security strains.

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Intestinal carriage of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Psae) constitutes a pivotal prerequisite for subsequent fatal endogenous infections in patients at risk. We here addressed whether fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) could effectively combat MDR-Psae carriage. Therefore, secondary abiotic mice were challenged with MDR-Psae by gavage. One week later, mice were subjected to peroral FMT from either murine or human donors on 3 consecutive days. Irrespective of murine or human origin of fecal transplant, intestinal MDR-Psae loads decreased as early as 24 h after the initial FMT. Remarkably, the murine FMT could lower intestinal MDR-Psae burdens by approximately 4 log orders of magnitude within 1 week. In another intervention study, mice harboring a human gut microbiota were perorally challenged with MDR-Psae and subjected to murine FMT on 3 consecutive days, 1 week later. Strikingly, within 5 days, murine FMT resulted in lower loads and carrier rates of MDR-Psae in mice with a human gut microbiota. In conclusion, FMT might be a promising antibiotics-independent option to combat intestinal MDR-Psae carriage and thus prevent from future endogenous infections of patients at risk.

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Abstract

Enterocolitis caused by Campylobacter jejuni represents an important socioeconomic burden worldwide. The host-specific intestinal microbiota is essential for maintaining colonization resistance (CR) against C. jejuni in conventional mice. Notably, CR is abrogated by shifts of the intestinal microbiota towards overgrowth with commensal E. coli during acute ileitis. Thus, we investigated whether oral transplantation (TX) of ileal microbiota derived from C. jejuni susceptible mice with acute ileitis overcomes CR of healthy conventional animals. Four days following ileitis microbiota TX or ileitis induction and right before C. jejuni infection, mice displayed comparable loads of main intestinal bacterial groups as shown by culture. Eight days following ileitis induction, but not ileal microbiota TX, however, C. jejuni could readily colonize the gastrointestinal tract of conventional mice and also translocate to extra-intestinal tissue sites such as mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood within 4 days following oral infection. Of note, C. jejuni did not further deteriorate histopathology following ileitis induction. Lack of C. jejuni colonization in TX mice was accompanied by a decrease of commensal E. coli loads in the feces 4 days following C. jejuni infection. In summary, oral ileal microbiota TX from susceptible donors is not sufficient to abrogate murine CR against C. jejuni.

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Szabolcs Vigvári
,
Zsuzsanna Nemes
,
Áron Vincze
,
Jenő Solt
,
Dávid Sipos
,
Zsófia Feiszt
,
Ágnes Kappéter
,
Beáta Kovács
, and
Zoltán Péterfi

for the treatment of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea with faecal transplantation. [Módszertani ajánlás a Clostridium difficile fertőzéshez asszociált hasmenés széklettranszplantációval történő kezeléséhez.] Orv. Hetil., 2013, 154 (1), 10

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors:
Gergely György Nagy
,
Zsuzsa Tudlik
,
Lajos Gergely
,
József Kónya
,
Piroska Orosi
,
Éva Rákóczi
,
Judit Szabó
,
Csaba Várvölgyi
,
Eszter Vitális
, and
György Paragh

difficile infection associated pseudomembranous colitis with faecal transplantation. [Életet veszélyeztető, terápiarefrakter Clostridium difficile fertőzés okozta pseudomembranosus colitis

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– 638 ( 2013 ) 41. Rabe SM : Treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection with fecal transplantation . Gastroenterol

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