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monitoring of floodplain soils (BALOGH et al., 2017; SZABÓ et al., 2008, 2010), oxbows, their waters and sediments (FLEIT & LAKATOS, 2003; BABCSÁNYI et al., 2019) and certain elements of the soil-plant system (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, Zn) in the given area

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changeover in sandbank fish assemblages in a Neotropical floodplain river . J. Fish Biol. 63 : 442 – 459 . Arrington , D. A. and K. O. Winemiller . 2006 . Habitat affinity, the seasonal

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Bulletin 3 : 171 – 173 . Petrášová , M. , Jarolímek , I. and Medvecká , J. 2013 . Neophytes in Pannonian Hardwood floodplain forests — History, present situation and

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Koncsos L., Derts Zs. Flood risk reduction and water quality management by deep floodplain inundations, 12th IWA International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control , Venice, Italy, 4–8 October 2010, pp. 1340

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1. 53 66 Oláh J., Natural rivermanagement, Resources and fruition of floodplains (in Hungarian), Magyar Tudomány , Vol. XLVII, No. 9, 2002, pp

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Abstract  

Neutron activation analysis was performed on aluvial soil samples from several sites on the floodplains of the Amazon River and its major tributaries for trace elements determination. The spatial and temporal variations of chemical composition of floodland sediments in the Amazon basin are discussed. No significant difference was found in trace elemental distribution in the floodland soils along the Amazon main channel, even after the source material has been progressively diluted with that from lowland draining tributaires. It was also seen that the average chemical composition of floodplain soils compares well with that of the suspended sediments.

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Community Ecology
Authors: B. Tajthi, R. Horváth, Sz. Mizser, D. D. Nagy, and B. Tóthmérész

Urban areas have been growing radically worldwide, causing considerable changes in biodiversity of natural habitats. In floodplain forests, we studied the effects of urbanization on ground-dwelling spider assemblages along a rural–suburban–urban gradient in Hungary. We tested three traditional hypotheses (intermediate disturbance hypothesis, habitat specialist hypothesis and hygrophilous species hypothesis) and two novel expectations (shade-preferring species hypothesis, and disturbance sensitive species hypothesis) on spiders. We found that the total number of species was higher in the suburban habitat than in rural and urban ones, supporting the intermediate disturbance hypothesis. We found a decrease in the species richness of forest specialist and shade-preferring species along the urbanization gradient. We found that the number of hygrophilous and disturbance sensitive species was the lowest in the urban habitat. The spider assemblages of the rural and suburban habitats were clearly separated from the assemblages of urban habitats. Based on our findings we emphasize that low and moderate intensity of forest management contributes to the preservation of the local species richness in floodplain forests.

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A normalization method was tested for the detection of low level chromium contamination in the soil of the Tisza River Floodplain in Hungary. The soils' so-called “total” metal concentration (strong acid extractable fraction) is the basis of many environmental evaluation methods, soil tests.  In the floodplain soils cadmium, lead, zinc and copper occur in elevated concentrations, but their chromium concentration is not significantly higher than that of the control soils.  The normalization method makes it possible to calculate the anthropogenic and geogenic chromium concentration in soil. Anthropogenic chromium was not detectable on the control sites, but a significant amount (4-14 mg/kg) was found in the floodplain soil samples. The applied normalization method proved the low level chromium contamination in the floodplain.

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The floodplain herbaceous vegetation of the Paraná River (Argentina) was destroyed by a catastrophic extraordinary flood in 1982-83. The main communities were Panicum prionitis tall grasslands. According to a succession model, they were seral communities that would have evolved to hygrophilous forest. After the flood, the area was surveyed in 1984, 1988 and 2002 and analyzed with numerical methods. First, the area was invaded by a community of annual species, which were the sparse species of tall grasslands, but five years after the colonization this community disappeared and was replaced by the original tall grasslands and turfs. The tall grasslands rapid recovery and the absence of woody species support the hypothesis that this community is a stable community which was rejuvenated by catastrophic floods and was prevented to develop into woody species communities.

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Capon, S.J. 2005. Flood variability and spatial variation in plant community composition and structure on a large arid floodplain. J. Arid Environ. 60:283–302. Capon S.J. Flood

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