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A novel screening immunoassay for histamine was used for detection of histamine in different foodstuffs. The detection limit of this assay was 20 µg kg-1. The concentration of histamine varied between 182-982 µg kg-1 in sauerkraut, cheese and fish samples and 26-18433 µg l-1 in milk, sparkling wine and wines. The applied competitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA) seemed a reliable technique for simple and rapid determination of histamine in food.

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Bureau, J. (2003): The European Food labeling Policy and Regulation: How Good Is at Informing, Protecting and Persuading? Proceedings of Conference of the FAMPS (the Food and Agricultural Marketing Policy

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We used an alternative approach, loop-mediated isothermal amplification, to detect Mangalitza component in food products, and it has been compared to an established Recombinase Polymerase Amplification test. The correlation between the assays was significant (P<0.01). Linear determination coefficient between the assays was 0.993 and level of diagnostic agreement was high (Kappa=0.971).

Previously, a real-time PCR method based on TaqMan probe was developed (Szántó-Egész et al., 2013) for detection of Mangalitza meat in food products, using a Mangalitza specific sequence. Other Mangalitza specific sequences suitable for the same purpose are also in use (V. Stéger, personal communication).

Approaches like real-time monitoring of accumulation of the specific DNA product usually require specialised laboratory equipment. For Mangalitza detection, portable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification (RPA) approach has been developed (Szántó-Egész et al., 2016), which requires a device capable of maintaining 39 °C and a lateral flow strip with easy yes/no indication of the successful amplification.

We wanted to develop another fast, non-PCR based test with minimal laboratory requirement to provide a third possibility to detect Mangalitza component in food.

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1 Introduction Food colorants are ingredients added to a food or beverage to change color [ 1 ]. Food and drink coloring has been widely used for centuries. The color was often added to signal quality, prompt instantaneous consumer awareness of the

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Although vitamin C is essential as an antioxidant and as a cofactor in a series of enzymatic reactions, the ability for ascorbate biosynthesis was lost in humans. Thus, horticultural products and derived fruit drinks or commercial vitamin C products are considered to be important sources for the ascorbic acid intake in the human diet. These facts underline the importance of analytical methods for ascorbic acid determination in different food products.

In our study two spectrophotometric and a fluorometric ascorbic acid determination methods have been compared with each other and with the so-called etalon HPLC method to find the best for small or middle sized food analytic laboratories with a sample number of up to several hundreds. As a result of our experiments we could establish that the OPDA-fluorometric method can be suggested for the determination of samples containing ascorbate at low concentrations. Unfortunately, the analytical properties of the OPDA method with spectrophotometric detection have been lagging far behind the others. The 2,2′-bipyridyl method could give a balanced performance for all tests. Furthermore, the results gained by this method are the closest to the results of the reference HPLC method in the case of fruit and vegetable samples.

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Abstract  

In the investigation of foods by thermal analysis and calorimetric techniques, many physico-chemical effects can be observed in the temperature range between –50 and 300°C. These thermal phenomena may be either endothermic, such as melting, gelatinization, denaturation, evaporation or exothermic, such as crystallization, oxydation, fermentation. Glass transitions are observed as a shift in the base line; this information, associated with water content and water activity determinations, is of particular interest in relation to storage of food powders but also for gas retention in powders foreseen to foam when dissolved.The thermal behavior of foods strongly depends on their composition; we therefore present first the thermal characteristics of the major food constituents: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, water and then of raw and reconstituted food.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
B. Raposa
,
E. Antal
,
J. Macharia
,
M. Pintér
,
N. Rozmann
,
D. Pusztai
,
M. Sugár
, and
D. Bánáti

proper quantity and quality of all those nutrients that are necessary for the maintenance of the body's physiological processes. A balanced and healthy diet contains a good variety of certain foods in appropriate quantities ( Lonnie et al., 2018

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B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains have been associated with gastro-intestinal infections due to enterotoxins production. The possibility of differentiating between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis is a real need in preventing intoxication and in monitoring potentially contaminated foods. The use of DNA comparison provides clearer results than classical microbiological methods in distinguishing B. cereus from B. thuringiensis . The use of a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) followed by Endonuclease Restriction (RE) made the distinction possible in spite of the huge similarity between the two closely related species.

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Brown , D. (1993): Plastics packaging of food products: the environmental dimension. Trends Food Sci. Tech. , 4 , 294–300. Brown D

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Food microflora is a complex and mutable ecosystem where the effects of microbial culture addition are still not entirely foreseeable due to microbial diversity. Starter, probiotic, and adjunct microorganisms are widely selected and used in food to improve quality and safety; they may be formulated as monostrain or multistrain cultures. Lactic acid bacteria are included among the main groups deemed useful for these aims. Compatibility tests can constitute an effective way to assess interactions among lactic acid bacteria. Food microflora composition is generally examined using both culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The existing limits of each method can be overcome by combining them, so that they give more information on microbial complexity. Since mixed cultures of starter, probiotic, or adjunct lactic acid bacteria provide more beneficial effects than single cultures, future research should be guided by compatibility tests to show the most suitable and beneficial mixed cultures.

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