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The paper deals with some food names in Russian (апельсин, ананас) within the framework of linguoculturological approach. The aim of this study is to analyze the main tendencies prevailing in the semantic adaptation of these loanwords that entered the Russian language in the 18th century. The first part is devoted to the conditions of appearance of these words in Russian culture and their semantic characteristics. The second part contains the description of semantic shifts that occur during the formation of cultural connotations of orange and pineapple. The author also demonstrates the manner in which semantic shifts can be used to describe a huge amount of cultural knowledge or cultural information. Proceeding from the notion of “cultural memory”, I set out to show that the phraseological meaning is a complex structure including semantic information and its conceptual basis. In my study, I would like to demonstrate what processes go on during its actualization in idiomaticity. The analysis is conducted on the basis of data found in the Russian National Corpus.

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The word hrianka 'toast (bread)', having a Middle Slovak phonetic form, derives from the Proto-Slavic verb grejZ, grŠjati. This toast is made in several delicious varieties and used even for curing headache and stomach ache. As a personal name, it is dated from 1688. A man called Hrianka changed his name for Hollós in 1908. His son is Attila Hollós, the editor of Studia Slavica. The author of this paper greets him on his 70th birthday.

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): http://www.marketingapad.lv Ministry of Agriculture Republic of Latvia (2004b): Agriculture and Rural Area of Latvia. Riga: Ministry of Agriculture Republic of Latvia. Protecting Food Names

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the culture of origin, and for many people, that is all was left from their past. Food names, expressions, recipes in original language have remained and preserved. For descendants and younger generations, this remaining knowledge could also be a

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realia: food names, currency units, etc.; • Proper names: personal names, place names, names of organizations; • Intralinguistic cultural references: address forms, idioms, proverbs, languagespecific collocations, stylistically marked synonyms. Occurrence

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